Clase IMOCA, cinco nuevos barcos en las últimas seis semanas.



© Photo DMG Mori

Fuente info IMOCA

Press release
Thursday 5 september 2019

Five new IMOCAs launched in the space of six week

After Jérémie Beyou’s Charal, the first new generation monohull launched a year ago, things sped up this summer with the launch of no fewer than five new IMOCAs in just over six weeks… In all, eight brand new IMOCAs will have been built for the 2020 Vendée Globe, confirming the commanding success of a thriving IMOCA class. We look at this today in more detail

Over the past month and a half, on average one brand new IMOCA was launched each week. In chronological order, Sébastien Simon’s Arkea-Paprec on 20th July; Alex Thomson’s Hugo Boss on 4th August; Charlie Dalin’s Apivia on 5th August and Kojiro Shiraishi’s DMG Mori on 2nd September. On Saturday 7th September, it will be Thomas Ruyant’s turn to unveil his new Advens for cybersecurity. Two other brand new IMOCAs are also currently being built, Corum l’Epargne for Nicolas Troussel and L’Occitane for Armel Tripon.

Sébastien Simon (Arkea-Paprec): “Confident we have made the right choices

Sébastien Simon’s team was the first to leap into action this summer, launching the new Arkea-Paprec (designed by Kouyoumdjian) on 20th July. Since the, the boat has been out sailing regularly and in particular took part in the Rolex Fastnet Race (retired due to a short circuit), which was followed by a training course at the Finistère Ocean Racing training centre. During this course, Sébastien Simon and Vincent Riou were able to see how they measured up against two other new generation foilers, Charal and Apivia. “It’s hard to draw any conclusions from this training, as the weather conditions were very tricky,” explained Sébastien. “But we did manage to see that the boat has a lot of potential. We are confident we have made the right choices, even if we know there is still a lot of work to do, in particular in calibrating the electronics. We can make a lot of progress still and are looking ahead to making changes. In terms of the mechanical aspects, these boats are very complicated and setting them up right takes a lot of time. We hope to get 100% of her potential by the start of the Transat Jacques Vabre.” How does Sébastien Simon see his IMOCA in comparison with his rivals? “The hull that is closest to ours, which is powerful and straight is Apivia. The shape of Charal and Hugo Boss is completely different, as they are rounder and with a larger rocker. Each of us has our own type of foil. We’ll see in a few months from now what that may mean in terms of performance.”

Charlie Dalin (Apivia): “a well-built boat”

A trained naval architect, Charlie Dalin was keen to follow each phase of the design and construction of his Apivia (designed by Verdier). “I was heavily involved in all of the choices. I know all her characteristics down to the smallest detail. I have had this boat in mind for a long time, so that even before she was launched, I felt I knew her well,” he said. “We haven’t yet been out ten times on her, but everything seems to be working well. Apivia seems to be a well-built boat. They’ve done a fine job and I’m very pleased with the systems we have chosen, her ease of handling and in particular the closed off protective cover.” Accompanied by his co-skipper, Yann Eliès, Charlie Dalin took advantage of the training session at the Finistère centre to carry out his first speed tests, keeping a watchful eye on Charal and Arkea-Paprec of course. “Taking into account that she has only just been launched, we’re not doing too badly. People have been talking a lot about hulls and foils, but we must not forget the “engine” on these boats, by which I mean the sails. I’m very pleased and for a first set, the sails are interesting,” said a content Charlie, before adding a word of caution. “It is still too early to make any conclusions. We haven’t yet sailed in a wide enough range of conditions to do that. The first real test will be the Transat Jacques Vabre. After that race, which is a bit like the start of the Vendée Globe, we’ll see things more clearly and be able to say how we measure up against the others.”

Alex Thomson (Hugo Boss): “We’re not afraid of doing things differently”

Living up to his reputation, Alex Thomson impressed everyone in early August when he presented his new IMOCA in the colours of Hugo Boss (designed by VPLP). “We have innovated and pushed back the limits. We’re not afraid of doing things differently. We may not always get it right, but we acknowledge that. But we’re not afraid of exploring things that haven’t been done before,” declared the British skipper, who is waiting for the Transat Jacques Vabre to do battle against the other new generation IMOCAs. Alex’s rocket stands out with her cockpit, which is completely closed, offering better protection while allowing him to see clearly what is happening at the front of the boat. As the cockpit is built into the hull, the centre of gravity has been lowered, as have the boom and sails, which means improvements in terms of aerodynamics.
Alex Thomson is also doing things differently with his foils. They are huge and curved and unlike anything seen on an IMOCA before. “Alex was bound to have the biggest foils in the fleet,” smiled Sébastien Simon. “We too thought of that option with a constant curve, but in the end we didn’t go down that road, as we didn’t think it would be the most efficient. We’ll see who was right.”

Kojiro Shiraishi (DMG Mori): “See what I am capable of achieving”

Launched very recently (on 2nd September), DMG Mori, Kojiro Shiraishi’s new IMOCA was designed by VPLP and built using the moulds from Charal. “I have been dreaming of a new boat for thirty years,” said the Japanese skipper. “I was unable to complete the 2016-2017 Vendée Globe after dismasting, but I found a new sponsor, who agreed to build a brand new IMOCA.” While waiting for his new boat to be launched, he was able to try out a foiler, thanks to training sessions in Cascais aboard Yannick Bestaven’s Maître CoQ under the leadership of Roland Jourdain. After the naming ceremony for DMG Mori, planned for 11th September in Lorient, Kojiro Shiraishi and his team will be able to carry out their first trips and start work on setting up the boat. The Japanese sailor will be competing in the Transat Jacques Vabre, with a co-skipper at his side, whose name has not yet been announced. “I can’t wait to race against the other competitors to see what I am capable of achieving, in particular against the other new IMOCAs, which seem to be excellent,” added Kojiro.

Thomas Ruyant (Advens for cybersecurity): “We have been pushing the architects to their limits”

The final boat to be launched this summer will be Thomas Ruyant’s IMOCA (designed by Verdier), which is due to come out of the yard on Saturday. “We remain fully focused on the finishing touches to our boat, but of course, we have been watching the other IMOCAs that have recently been launched. We have already seen that they are very fast and that the sailors in charge of them are in good shape,” explained Thomas. “It’s interesting, because the new IMOCAs have been designed by various architects. They have been pushed to the limits. It’s fantastic to be part of this with what should be a great boat. The IMOCA to which we are the closest is Apivia, as she was designed by the same architect and using the same basic designs.” According to Thomas Ruyant, “Each boat will have their own preferred range of use.” The skipper from Northern France added: “We have all gone for different choices, in particular in terms of ease of handling depending on our own experiences. With the team, I went for a good all-round boat, which is reliable, robust and “easy” to sail. We have also done a lot of work on the sails. We have gone for some very different choices in that area…”

AC36. Emirates Team New Zealand bota “Te Aihe” (Delfín), su nuevo AC75.



copyright ETNZ

copyright ETNZ

copyright ETNZ

Fuente info ETNZ

Emirates Team New Zealand launch their first AC75

Auckland, New Zealand – 6th September 2019

Emirates Team New Zealand christened their first AC75 at their team base in the heart of the America’s Cup village in Auckland today.

The significant milestone was celebrated with the team, their families, sponsors and suppliers. The boat was christened “Te Aihe” (Dolphin) by Marcus Gerbich – member of the MND Foundation – and blessed by Ngati Whatua.

Emirates Team New Zealand COO Kevin Shoebridge, who has overseen the development and launch of plenty of boats over the years, was especially proud to be witnessing the Kiwi AC75 emerge for the first time.

“This is a significant occasion for the team, not just because it is another new boat, but really because when we won the America’s Cup in 2017 we very quickly had to come up with a new concept of boat that would really continue to push the boundaries of innovation and technology in the America’s Cup. So in the relatively short timeframe since November in 2017 when we published the concept, to seeing it in the flesh today is an amazing testament to the entire team willing to push things all the way from concept to design to build and fit out” said Shoebridge.

It has taken over 100,000 man-hours to design and build the boat with a group of about 65 people between designers and boat builders who have been working quietly throughout the past year. Sean Regan has led the set up of the team’s bespoke production facility on Auckland’s North Shore from a blank factory floor to producing the first AC75.

“We have had the pressure on since the moment we decided to establish our own production facility very early on in this campaign. We have built up a really great team of 42 fully committed people at the yard who have been working full-on to get this boat out the door,” said Regan.

“Even for the most experienced boat builders on the team, this has been a very unique build because it is such a sophisticated boat. But it is really encouraging that for a number of our junior and apprentice boat builders their first build has been on a boat that is really on the cutting edge of complexity in build, design and performance.”

Emirates Team New Zealand Head of Design Dan Bernasconi was a central figure in the development of the AC75 Class Rule before turning his team of designers’ attention to the specific design of the Emirates Team New Zealand boat.

“There’s a huge amount of innovation in the design and build of the AC75 – more than we saw in the AC50’s in Bermuda” said Bernasconi. “The AC75 is a completely new concept and has presented plenty of challenges across many areas – but this is precisely what the Rule was designed to do – to push development to the extreme. We haven’t been conservative in any aspect of our design; it’s not long until we need to commit to the design of our second boat, which we will ultimately race in the 2021 America’s Cup, so we need to test as many of our ideas as possible in the yacht we’re launching today.”

Unlike the other main Challengers, Emirates Team New Zealand has focused the development of their first boat entirely with their in-house simulator as opposed to building a smaller scale test boat to validate concepts on the water. So once the AC75 goes for its maiden sail, it will be the first time the team has collectively sailed since winning the America’s Cup on June 26th 2017.

“It won’t be without nerves the first time we go sailing, but I am sure that is no different for all of the teams.” said Glenn Ashby

“The AC75’s are big powerful and fast boats so they will be a handful, but from our understanding through our simulations they are inherently a safer boat to sail than what we have sailed in the past two America’s Cups. As with any new boat it is all about slowly getting it up to speed, learning how to sail it most efficiently, pushing the development of the designs and then putting in the hours in getting ready to race for the ACWS Sardinia in April 2020.”

Emirates Team New Zealand will now focus on a busy period of testing on Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf over the spring and summer months having the advantage of developing and training on the race area of the America’s Cup Match which will be raced in March 2021.

Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton concluded: “I wish to thank every single team member for the hard work they’ve done to get us to this day. A special thanks also to all our sponsors and partners for all of their valued support so far and everything they will continue to do during our journey towards the America’s Cup Match in 2021. It is an exciting time, but things are about to get a whole lot more so from now.”

About the name:

The name Te Aihe (Dolphin) is based on the whakatauki (proverb):
“Mā te Aihe e tuitui ai i te ngaru moana, mā te Rangatira e tuitui ai i te tangata”.
“As the dolphin sows through the seas so does a leader sew people together”.

Using technology to set precedence

The AC75 Class is a 75 foot, high performance monohull governed by the AC75 Class Rule which was published on 29 March 2018. The Class Rule is open enough to guarantee a wide margin of freedom to the designers but introduces certain one-design elements for cost containment also.

The AC75 supplied parts – identical for all the teams – are the foil arms, the foil cant system and the rigging. The shape and base laminate of the mast is also controlled by the Class Rule.

The AC75 rotating mast is a 26.5 meter long one-design ‘D’ shaped section that weighs about 300kg and serves as the leading edge of the double skinned mainsail.

Emirates Team New Zealand’s mast has been built at Southern Spars in Auckland whereas the rigging package was built at Future Fibres in Valencia.

The two other one-design components are key to make the boat fly.

The foil arms, built at Persico Marine in Italy, are the result of a project led by Luna Rossa Challenge with the collaboration of all the America’s Cup teams and New Zealand based composite engineering consultancy Pure Design and Engineering.

Each 4.5 metre long carbon foil arm has a wing attached to its tip. The foil wings are custom designed and built by each team.

Driving the foil arms is the electronic and hydraulic foil cant system (FCS), , another one design supplied part, which moves the arms and wings in and out of the water. The foil cant system was designed by Emirates Team New Zealand and assembled in Auckland before being distributed to all teams earlier in the year.

The rest of the Class Rule is open and being a new concept, leaves the design quite open as no proven path has yet been defined for these types of boats. Any shrouding of the yachts in the 36th America’s Cup is prohibited so teams won’t be able to hide their different design approaches and subsequent developments.

The most visible differences will be seen in the hull shapes and deck layouts. Despite a number of basic constraints such as the length, the hull shape has few significant limits on ­shape or structure. Design teams will be looking for a shape with minimal drag in light-wind displacement mode while also addressing the stability required to generate thrust for take off.

Evident differences will be displayed also in the foil wings and wing flaps as they are also open to design and, being T-style foils, their shapes have been less explored than the L- foils used in the last two Cups.

The double-surface mainsail – a new innovation of the 36th America’s Cup Class Rule – will be key in the performance of the boat and a lot of hours have been invested in its design.

The hydraulic and electronic control systems, powered and controlled by the crew, operate key components of the boat such as the foils and they have been subjected to important developments as well but will they remain a vey guarded secret by each team.

All in the numbers

23: the length in metres of the new boat
26.5: the height in meters of the mast from the deck
11: the crew onboard
6.5: the weight in tonnes of the boat
5: the maximum beam of the boat and the foils’ maximum draft
4: the foil wing span in metres
65: number of people working on the design and build of the boat. 30 designers and 35 boatbuilders have put in the hours to design and build “Te Aihe”.
100,000+: number of man-hours it took to design and build the boat.
2021: the 36th America’s Cup will take place from the 6th to 21st of March 2021
1851: the year the America’s Cup was born
3: Times New Zealand has won the America’s Cup

62’ performance sloop, el nuevo proyecto de Bottino Design.







Fuente info Bottino Design

Presentación del 62’ Full carbono que está siendo construido en MD Technologies. El barco nació como un crucero rápido con todas las comodidades, fácil de navegar, simple de operar dada la baja complejidad de los sistemas para un barco de esta eslora, posee características y relaciones de un barco mas de regata para navegar y correr sin resignar nada. La construcción de casco, cubierta y estructuras son en Carbono/Epoxy/Vacio. Mástil y botavara de carbono con 3 crucetas retrasadas, rieles longitudinales con entrador para genoas 110% y foque auto virante. Stay de trinquetilla removible. Timón y botalón de carbono.
Interiores en roble tipo de construcción liviana con alma de espuma y honeycomb.

Las características principales del barco son:

Eslora 18.8m
Manga 5.40m
Calado 3.40m
Desplazamiento 21ton
Área Velica ceñida 210m2
Área velica en popa: 485m2
Motorización Volvo D3-150HP

TF35, la nueva generación de los catamaranes foileadores de Ginebra.


© Loris Von Siebenthal

© Loris Von Siebenthal

© Loris Von Siebenthal

Fuente info TF35

TF35 boat zero hits the water

On Tuesday, 20 August, the next generation of high performance foiling catamaran was unveiled as the TF35 splashed on Lake Geneva for its first test sail.

Compared to its predecessors, the TF35 has been designed with the ambitious brief to offer top level foiling to a wider audience of sailors. With earlier take-off speeds, guaranteed foiling upwind and down and a fully automatic flight control system, the TF35 uses the latest in foiling technology, both to improve performance and simplify high speed foiling while making it easier to race.

Having lead the process of development to create the D35, Ernesto Bertarelli is once again one of the committed group of owners involved in the development of the TF35.

Bertarelli explains: “My hope for the new design is that it is not only as successful as the D35, but that it also becomes a competitive class internationally on open waters. The TF35 is one-design, very high performance and, most excitingly, is designed to foil upwind in light conditions.

“I love racing on the lake and the camaraderie of the owners we have involved in the project. Once all the boats are up and running successfully then racing on open water will bring a fresh challenge to the competition,” he adds.

A project 21 months in the making, the innovative TF35′s journey from first concept to first splash was spearheaded by an experienced design team. Gonzalo Redondo and his group at d3 Applied Technologies on the aero/hydrodynamic design and performance, Dirk Kramers (SDK Structures) on the structure design and engineering, Luc Dubois on design and flight control development, Marc Menec (IS&3D Eng) on design and 3D modelling and Adam May on design. With the addition of Jean-Marie Fragnière in charge of the production and build.

“What we have created is super innovative and totally new,” explains Menec. “Our brief was to create a boat that would fly in very light wind, to be driven by an owner driver and to have electronic stability. It has been a really exciting project for us as a design team as we have created this crazy high-spec racing machine but that will be raced by small teams.”

Having worked tirelessly to improve the weaker areas of the previous foiling catamaran design and further build on its strengths the TF35 design team have delivered a boat which will be fully foiling from 9 knots true wind speed upwind and 7 knots true wind speed downwind.

Key to the success of the boat is the one design flight regulation system, which fully automates the height and pitch of the foils, allowing for a smooth and stable flight and the sailors to fully focus on the racing.

Compared to other flying boats which demand the complete concentration of helm and trim, and coordination of the crew, the TF35′s automatic flight control maintains the TF35′s ride height, as boat zero helm Jerome Clerc explained after the first test sail: “Tuesday was amazing. Considering it was the first time the boat has touched the water, it is a real credit to the design team how impressively easy it was to foil so quickly. We have been testing the flight control system and the foil design on a development boat, a small cat, over the last couple of months so this was an early indicator we were on the right track.

“The boat felt very stable and the plan over the coming months is to learn and develop further the flight control systems to ensure we get it just right. In stronger winds we are confident that the boat will feel secure reaching 40 knots.”

TF35 class manager Bertrand Favre adds: “We have been very fortunate to have passionate and committed group of owners supporting the project.

“The last few weeks have been intense with the assembly of boat zero. Our first day of sailing went far beyond our expectation, in only nine knots of breeze we were comfortably foiling reaching 17 knots boat speed upwind and 23 knots downwind with a very stable flight.”

The TF35 will now undertake a period of on water testing before the boat is officially launched in September. From there the eight boats, currently in production, will be completed and launched over the winter period allowing the teams to train ahead of the 2020 season.

To find out more about the TF35 visit www.TF35.org

AC36, expectativa ante la inminente botadura de los primeros AC75.

Fuente info AC36

AC36 NEWSLETTER

16th August 2019

EXCITEMENT HEIGHTENS AS AMERICA’S CUP TEAMS AND FANS ANTICIPATE FIRST EVER AC75 LAUNCH

It is always a big deal in any America’s Cup cycle when the first tranche of AC Class yachts is revealed. Fans and teams alike pore over every photograph and video they can get their hands on to analyse what each of the teams’ design departments have come up with.

That eager anticipation is ratcheted up several levels however when the teams are given the much rarer opportunity to design to a completely new America’s Cup class rule – as is the case for the 36th edition of the America’s Cup with the advent of the 75-foot foiling monohull AC75 Class Rule.

Even more exciting and challenging is the fact that designing and building a foiling monohull of that size has never ever been done before. It is an utterly new concept – and that means the designers are out on their own, breaking new ground with precious little, if any, relevant data available to refer back to.

It is now a tantalising prospect that four teams – the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand, Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team (Challenger of Record), NYYC American Magic, and INEOS TEAM UK – could all launch their first AC75 yachts in the next few weeks.

The fifth America’s Cup team – Stars + Stripes Team USA – is yet to complete the build of its AC75, but the team hopes to have the boat on the water later this year.

So what can we expect to learn from this upcoming first round of AC75 launches? Read the full story!

THE AC75 CLASS

Click below and find out the parameters within which teams can design a yacht eligible to compete in the 36th America’s Cup: