World Cup Series Miami. Triunfo español en clase 470 con Jordi Xammar Hernandez y Nicolás Rodríguez García.



Fuente info World Sailing

Calling the shifts equals success at Hempel World Cup Series Miami
For immediate release: 02/03/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

Correctly calling first shift is great. Plenty of sailing races have been won by the person or team who anticipates the first wobble in the breeze and positions correctly to best take advantage of it.

But sometimes, it’s the last shift that provides the more enduring laugh. That was the case in the Women’s 470 Medal Race, which kicked off the final day of racing at the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series Miami on Biscayne Bay.

Frederike Loewe and Anna Markfort (GER) started the race with a slim lead in the overall standings. Not only was their gold medal position at risk, there was a legitimate possibility they could slip off the podium entirely as fourth place was just eight points at the start of the race. After a bad start at the pin end, the German duo spent the majority of the race in a virtual fourth place.

“The start was really bad,” said Loewe. “We were too close to the leeward starting boat. That was way too risky.”

Hannah Mills and Eilidth McIntyre (GRB) on the other hand, nailed the start and the first leg and rounded the first two marks in the lead and wearing the virtual gold medal.

But defending against three other teams is always a challenge, even more so in light air, and on the second lap, the trailing boats found a window of opportunity. First it was Camille LeCointre and Aloise Retornaz (FRA) who were not a medal threat, but would slip by and go on to win the race. Then it was the eventual bronze medalists, Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA). The final dagger came at the leeward mark when Markfort and Loewe and their compatriots Fabienne Oster and Anastasiya Winkel (GER) converged from opposite sides of the course and both slipped inside the British team at the final mark rounding. The order wouldn’t change on the final leg, giving Loewe and Markfort the win, their first medal in a Hempel World Cup Series competition, while the silver went to Oster and Winkel, leaving Mills and McIntyre to ponder how something that had seemed so solid slipped away so quickly.

“What a comeback,” said Loewe moments after the finish, with a big smile. “[We didn’t think it was possible until] the very last downwind, close to the gate, really in the last moments.”

Markfort was quick to credit Loewe with finding that little bit of favourable wind at the last possible moment.

“I think having a good overview of the downwind is one of Freddie’s strengths throughout the whole regatta,” said Markfort. “We always managed to catch up on the downwinds because she always saw pressure that others didn’t see.”

Local favorites Stu McNay and David Hughes ended the regatta with a wire-to-wire win in the Men’s 470 Medal Race. But, with Naoki Ichino and Takashi Hasegawa (JPN) crossing the finish line right on the American’s heels, it was only good enough to move McNay and Hughes into fourth place. Ichino and Hasegawa held on to the bronze medal position they had at the beginning of the day and the same was true of the two teams ahead of them on the leader board. Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergström (SWE) were sixth in the Medal Race and claimed sliver while Jordi Xammar Hernandez and Nicolás Rodríguez García-Paz finished third in the Medal Race and won gold.

“We are really happy,” said Xammar. “It’s amazing to win a World Cup event and the first of 2019. We had a long pre-season so to be on top of the podium is good for us. We were happy with how we sailed before the Medal Race, but winning and keeping gold ahead of the Swedish team who are one of the best guys in the fleet is really good.

“It was a tough Medal Race. We had a good start but we were blocked in with some boats. At the top mark we weren’t in a good place, but we knew it was a long race and we could take our chance. When we had it, we did a good move and went ahead of the Swedish and we held on from there.”

With nine of 10 sailors starting the Finn Medal Race mathematically alive for a medal, and third through sixth separated by three points, the only thing that seemed certain was that the results would change. But it would’ve been hard to predict the drama that unfolded during the course of the race, particularly on the first leg, with virtually the majority of the 10-boat fleet sitting in a medal position at one point or another during the race.

Max Salminen (SWE) started the race with a four-point cushion over second, but quickly found himself in the back half of the fleet and, as a result, out of the medals. Meanwhile Luke Muller (USA) streaked into the lead, and the virtual gold medal, by working a clear lane on the right side of the first beat. Then Muller was whistled for breaking the prohibition against pumping, and he dropped into last after completing his penalty turn.

“All from the beginning I thought it was looking better on the left,” said Salminen. “Right from the start, I could see everyone on the right of me, hooking into some more pressure. I was compromised in my lane and I thought I’d go grab some of that and then I felt like I was extending all the time.”

At the top mark, Oskari Muhonen (FIN) pulled into the lead, which he would keep throughout the race and jump from sixth to silver in the overall standings. Salminen rounded second and while he would drop to fifth by the finish it was enough to keep gold, especially when Jonathan Lobert (FRA), who started the day in second, dropped from fifth to 10th on the second upwind leg.

“The wind completely died on the first downwind and the fleet was completely compressed down to the gate,” said Salminen. “Then I saw that my main opponents were going to the left again, and it was looking better over there, so I went after them. Then they had lots of better pressure on the right again and it made things a bit exciting.”

Muller found new life in the light air and, against all odds, pulled back to fourth by the second windward mark. He was able to fend off Salminen on the final two legs to hold on for the bronze, his first medal in a Hempel World Cup Series event and the first for the host country this year.

“It means a lot,” said Muller of the medal. “Then again, it’s one regatta and we had pretty much one type of conditions and I’m pretty good at [those conditions]. I know that I have a lot of weaknesses and a lot to work on and I’m determined to keep going. It’s definitely a great step and I’m grateful for my team with Luther [Carpenter, U.S. Finn coach] and Caleb Paine and just hoping to go up from here.”

Paige Railey approached the Laser Radial Medal Race planning to do whatever she could to make up the 13-point gap that separated her from gold. But overnight leader Dongshuang Zhang (CHN) countered that by sticking close to Railey off the starting line and, when she gained a little bit of an edge, pressing that advantage to stay between Railey and the finish line. With Zhang and Railey sailing at the back of the fleet, the only remaining question was whether Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) would be able to put enough boats between herself and Railey and swan her bronze for Railey’s silver. That dream ended at the second windward mark when Karachaliou clipped the windward mark with her boom and was forced to do a circle.

“I am very happy to get the gold medal in Miami,” Zhang said. “Our whole team trained very hard for three months in preparation for this event. The wind here hasn’t been very stable so it’s been up and down for everyone this week.”

With gold and silver locked up prior the Laser Medal Race, the primary drama was whether Rio 2016 gold medalist Tom Burton (AUS) would be able to hold off a hungry pack of four sailors all with designs on the final spot on the podium.

Charlie Buckingham (USA) kept Burton honest by working his way into second on the opening leg and remaining there for the remainder of the race. Burton dropped as far down as fifth, which would’ve put his position at risk, but crossed the finish line in third, right on Buckingham’s heels. Sam Meech (NZL) won the race to put an exclamation point on his silver medal in the regatta. Herman Tomasgaard (NOR), the gold medal in hand after one of the most impressive Hempel World Cup Series performances in recent memory—he led by 65 points going into the Medal Race—finished last.

“It’s been a lot of training, and it’s nice to see the results from it and it’s a good inspiration to continue with the training,” said Tomasgaard. “I think I’m a sailor that needs to sail a lot to improve. Some of the top guys manage with not as much sailing, but if I don’t train so much I start doing big mistakes and technical things.”

Despite his scoreline, which included nine top-five finishes, it wasn’t a perfect regatta.

“It’s quite a lot of things,” he said. “The first race yesterday, I was thinking too much about the results and not enough about doing a good race. To the future I’ll think more about that. You always have mistakes in the race, it’s just about making the least. A lot of the downwinds can, for sure be better, when I’m in a group. And the starts can be better.”

Genoa, Italy will host the third round of the Hempel World Cup Series from 14 to 22 April followed by the Final in Marseille, France early June.

RESULTADOS FINALES CLICK ACÁ

World Cup Series Miami. En Nacra 17, tercer puesto para Lange/Carranza y noveno para Majdalani/Bosco.






Repetición completa de todas las medal races del día sábado.

Fuente info World Sailing

Five podiums decided at Hempel World Cup Series Miami
For immediate release: 02/03/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

The pin may have been the preferred end of the starting line for the 49erFX Medal Race, the first of Day 5 of the Hempel World Cup Series Miami, but in light air there’s a lot of risk in starting in a pack.

So while Martine Soffiatti Grael and Kahena Kunze (BRA) did two tacks just before the gun and carved out a wide lane to work with at the committee boat end, overnight leaders Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) found themselves spit out the back of a pack of five boats all battling for position at the pin end.

“For us our goal was to have a clean start because in this light wind it’s very easy to get caught by the boat to leeward and I think we did that successfully,” said Grael, the defending gold medallist in the class from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. “It was pretty shifty, I was very happy with how the racecourse was set up.”

Light air usually means a lot of passing lanes and opportunities to atone for a poor start. At times, it appeared that Maloney and Meech would be able to grind into the top six, which would’ve guaranteed them the gold medal. But in the end Grael and Kunze hung on for second and Maloney and Meech came out on the wrong side of a tough battle on the final run with Stephanie Roble and Margaret Shea (USA) and Odile van Aanholt and Marieke Jongens (NED). The Kiwis finished ninth and dropped into silver. Charlotte Dobson and Saskia Tidey (GBR) were fourth in the race to earn the bronze medal.

“It was a hard decision which side of the course to go,” said Kunze. “We were just picking which shift [to tack on] and we did a really good race.”

The pin end was also the popular starting spot for the 49er class. In fact, there were so many boats starting at the pin end that fully half of the 10-boat fleet was over the line early. Among those crossing the line prematurely were Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell (GBR) and James Peters and Fynn Sterritt (GBR), who started the Medal Race second and third, respectively. Only Fletcher-Scott and Bithell returned to start properly. But they were so far behind there was no chance of challenging pre-race leaders Erik Heil and Thomas Ploessel (GER) for the gold medal, even though the German team didn’t exactly have the greatest start.

“The situation before the race was we were quite a few points ahead of Dylan and Stu, so it was a quite an easy start for us in the race,” said Ploessel. “We wanted to just get in and stay calm a little bit don’t match [race] too much. Then we matched a little bit at the start, but did our own start and that was fine. It turned out that at the start there were so many boats over that it was actually over, the race for the gold medal, because Dylan could not put enough boats between us so we had a fun race.”

Heil and Ploessel crossed the line third to secure the gold. Winning the Medal Race was another German team, Tim Fischer and Fabian Graf. In fact there were a record four German teams in the Medal Race.

“We are really happy that we have such a strong fleet,” said Ploessel. “It’s the first time ever that there were four boats from Germany in the Medal Race in a World Cup. It’s just better for everybody if they’re more good guys around. Everybody’s got to improve and there’s a higher chance for a medal in Tokyo.”

Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS) quickly removed much of the drama from the Nacra 17 Medal Race, at least in terms of who would get the gold. In fact, the defending Olympic silver medallists took control of the race before even crossing the starting line.

“The points were almost equal,” said Waterhouse, noting that he and Darmanin started the double-points Medal Race just four points ahead of Samuel Albrecht and Gabriela Nicolino de Sá (BRA). “We had to keep an eye on Santi Lange (ARG), but really it was almost a match race [with the Brazilian team]. I saw an opportunity where they got a little high above the start line and thought, ‘This is our chance to really sort of control them.’ We just managed to execute quite well. It’s really hard in those variable conditions because a small puff can come from anywhere and it changes the game. Lisa did a great job today keeping us going the right direction and I just focused on the competition.”

Having gained the upper hand off the line, Waterhouse and Darmanin left nothing to chance, stretching away from the fleet for a wire-to-wire win and the gold medal. Albrecht and Nicolino de Sá were third in the race to hold on to the silver while Santiago Lange and Cecilia Carranza Saroli were fourth and claimed bronze.

While Waterhouse still feels that the Brazilian team has an edge in light air, he is pleased with the progress he and Darmanin have made addressing one of their weaknesses.

“That’s why we’re here at the Hempel World Cup Series Miami,” he said. “It’s pretty renowned for light winds, and that’s an area we really need to improve in. We struggled at the worlds in those conditions and took a big, hard look at ourselves and said, ‘What have we got to do to get better.’ and I guess the simple answer is, find a place with light winds. No matter the result, whether we won or got 10th, the goal was to learn as much as we could by coming here. We’re surprised with the win, but we actually sailed pretty bloody well.”

In a light breeze, the RS:X is the most punishing Olympic sailing discipline to sail. Sailors will pump their sail all the way around the track to generate boat speed. With their heart rate at its limit for the entire 30 minute fleet race and 20 minute Medal Race, they must also make tactical decisions based on the wind and keep track of their competition.

When Zofia Noceti-Klepacka (POL) was caught starting early in the Women’s RS:X, the equation was at least simplified a little bit: Three women for three podium spots. The question remained, who would finish where.

Yunxiu Lu (CHN) started the race in first and was determined not to let the gold slip through her fingers.

“Today the wind was light, everybody was working hard,” said Lu. “The start line was very competitive, it was difficult. The Polish girl got an OCS. I just thought ‘work hard!’ Just pumping, pumping, pumping. ‘Keep going, need to go faster than everybody.’ I tried to do my best and it worked.”

Chinese sailors swept the top three spots in the Medal Race. Hongmei Shi was first, Lu second and Rio 2016 silver medalist Peina Chen was third. But only Lu stood on the podium in Regatta Park. Katy Spychakov (ISR) won silver while Charline Picon (FRA) took bronze.

Pawel Tarnowksi (POL) took a risk at the start of the Men’s RS:X Medal Race and it cost him a spot on the podium. The Polish sailor carried a six-point lead into the Medal Race, but the 22 points he picked up from the early start allowed three sailors to slip past him in the overall standings. Bing Ye (CHN) was the primary benefactor, going wire-to-wire for the win, which ensured him the gold medal. Radoslaw Furmanski (POL) earned the sliver with Pierre Le Coq (FRA) grabbing bronze.

“It’s really exciting to be here at World Hempel Series Miami Cup for the first time,” Ye said. “The sailing is really challenging here, but it was a really great opportunity to race here.”

Ye won the world championship in the RS:X class in 2017, but struggled in the 2018 World Championships, finishing 40th. This was an impressive return to form for Ye, but he’s careful not to look too far ahead.

“I’m only focused on the present, to do my best each day,” he said. “But I can promise I will show you a better performance in Tokyo.”

Both the Laser and Laser Radial fleets were able to scratch and claw their way to a full series. Hermann Tomasgaard (NOR) had his first bobble of the regatta, with a 30th, but rebounded with a third in the final race and will take a stunning 65-point lead into tomorrow’s Medal Race. He has locked up gold, and by no small margin. Sam Meech (NZL) has secured silver, provided he finishes the race, while Tom Burton (AUS) will need to hold off a handful of sailors with an outside chance of winning bronze. Burton must finish fifth or better to ensure himself of a medal.

The situation isn’t much different in the Laser Radial class. Donshuang Zhang (CHN) leads Paige Railey (USA) by 13 points. Both of those sailors are assured of a medal, Zhang can do no worse than silver. Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) is third and guaranteed at least a bronze provided she finishes the Medal Race.

The Finn class is set up for a very competitive Medal Race. No position in the top three is secure, with first through seventh mathematically alive for the gold. The class will put the live scoring algorithm to the test tomorrow. Max Salminen (SWE) has the lead by four points over Jonathan Lobert (FRA) and eight points over Luke Muller (USA), who won today’s only race. But just three points separate Muller from Oskari Muhonen (FIN) in sixth.

The top three boats in the Women’s 470 fleet are separated by just four points, setting up an intriguing battle for the podium positions. Frekerike Loewe and Anna Markfort (GER) are currently at the top of the standings with Hannah Mills and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) second and Fabienne Oster and Anastasiya Winkel (GER) in third. Should any of those teams falter in the Medal Race, Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA) will be eager jump onto the podium.

The nature of the Medal Race, which counts for double points and as the tiebreaker, means that any two teams within two points of one another are effectively tied. Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergström (SWE) may lead the regatta by a point over Spain’s Jordi Xammar Hernandez and Nicolás Rodríguex García-Paz, but it will be a who-beats-whom battle for gold tomorrow. Naoki Ichino and Takashi Hasegawa (JPN) and Balázs Gyapjas and Zsombor Gyapjas (HUN) are tied for third and technically alive for gold. But it’s given the 14-point spread from second to third, it’s probable those latter two teams will be marking one another in the race for bronze.

Racing commences at 12:00 local time and will be available to watch on World Sailing’s YouTube and Facebook.

Resultados finales click acá

World Cup Series Miami, día 4. Sábado de Medal races para 49er, 49erFX, Nacra 17 y RS:X. Lange/Carranza van por una medalla.




Fuente info World Sailing

Sailors navigate light wind on the path to Hempel World Cup Series Medal Races
For immediate release: 02/01/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

With 18 months until the Tokyo 2020 Olympic regatta, now is the time for medal hopefuls to do an honest self-assessment and figure out what weaknesses they need to shore up before the big show.

For Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS), the silver medallists from Rio 2016, one of the areas in need of improvement is light air speed. They came to Hempel World Cup Series Miami looking for the light, shifty conditions that most recreational sailors would rather avoid. To their delight, Biscayne Bay has delivered just what they needed.

“We’re really happy with how we’ve been sailing this week considering the conditions,” said Waterhouse. “In terms of racing, our main focus has just been consistency throughout the week as those conditions, it’s just so variable with your results. Also we’ve been struggling in the last year with our light air speed and we’ve been trying to focus on improving that. It’s hard to tell in such shifty conditions, but I think we’ve made little leaps in that.”

The Australians started the regatta with a 14th, but have been lights-out ever since. Eight of their 12 finishes have been inside the top-five and they will head into tomorrow’s double-points Medal Race with a four-point lead.

The Medal Races for all 10 classes will be streamed live on World Sailing’s YouTube and Facebook channels starting at 12:00 local time.

In second place heading into the Medal Race is Samuel Albrecht and Gabriela Nicolino de Sá (BRA). Albrecht finished 10th at the Rio 2016 Games with another crew.

The Brazilian team was leading the regatta until a 14th in today’s first race. But they rebounded with a pair of wins.

“We had a very hard first race,” said Nicolino de Sá. “We managed to finish 14th, but at one point we were around 20th. We did not have a clear sight of what was going on on the racecourse. But then we sat together, talked about it and decided to simplify things for the next races and it worked. [We focused on] clear lanes during the upwind mostly, getting out of trouble with other boats and trusting the numbers on our compass.”

If she was disappointed to have lost the lead, Nicolino de Sá didn’t show it.

“[Waterhouse and Darmanin] won silver medal in the last Olympics and they have been sailing together for quite a while,” she said. “We’re actually very happy to be battling against them. Not sure what to expect yet for tomorrow, we just want to give it our best.”

To hear Waterhouse talk about it, that may be all he and Darmanin can handle, especially if the forecast holds for less than 10 knots of breeze.

“The Brazilians are definitely the quickest in the light breeze,” he said. “We’ve just been trying to sail smart tactically to get around the lack of boatspeed.”

Should either of those teams falter significantly in the Medal Race, the crafty veterans and defending gold medalists Santiago Lange and Cecilia Carranza Saroli (ARG) could take advantage. They are 12 points behind second and 16 points out of first.

A key component of Laser sailor Hermann Tomasgaard’s (NOR) preparation for the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series Miami involved a week at the Laser Training Center in Cabarete, Dominican Republic. Aside from the obvious—tropical mid-winter weather—Tomasgaard went there for the consistently strong winds.

“We had a good group with the British and the Swedish and a lot of hiking, a lot of strong winds,” he said. “That’s maybe the problem you can have in Europe this time of year, you can have a lot of light winds, You get some strong-wind days, but never really for one and a half weeks.”

This regatta, however, has been anything but windy, with just one race that tested the sailors’ abdominal muscles. Nonetheless, Tomasgaard clearly found something in the azure Caribbean waters because he has been phenomenally fast and unbelievably consistent in some of the most mentally demanding conditions in a fleet where top-half finishes in the gold fleet are often considered keepers.

With two full-fleet races remaining and then Sunday’s Medal Race, Tomasgaard has established a 44-point lead over second place. His worst finish is a sixth. One decent race tomorrow and he will have clinched the gold with two races to spare, a virtually unheard-of feat in the modern Medal-Race format.

“It’s been very good,” he said. “Sailing is a little up and down all the time, and this week I’ve had quite a lot of up. I’m just enjoying it right now. I’ve had moments [like this before], but maybe not for as long as now. Now it’s been every race. It’s been good.”

The conditions today were similar to the previous three days, light and shifty.

“It was difficult, very, very shifty,” he said. “Big shifts from both sides. Quite light and big pressure differences as well with the shifts. [Success required managing a] little bit of both. We had a left pressure that was really stationary, that you really had to go into. It was in all the upwinds, almost, that you gained a little bit on that left shift, but it was difficult to know how far into it you had to go.”

He also credited a lot of his success to his ability to get off the starting line cleanly.

“I’ve had good starts, really good starts and I’ve tried to keep an open mind,” he said. “I tried to start where I think it’s going to be the best and keep an open mind and change my plan if I see something new coming.”

Should his final few races follow this pattern, Tomasgaard will have put together one of the more remarkable scorelines in recent memory. With 18 months until the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, is he peaking too early? Tomasgaard doesn’t see it that way.

“I’ve been climbing the last few years in the results, and it’s nice to see that the winter trainings are working well,” he said. “So I kind of take that, like ‘OK, we’re on the right track.’ Still, it’s early in the season, and a lot can change from Miami.”

Sam Meech (NZL) is second in the class with 65 points while Rio 2016 gold medalist Tom Burton (AUS) is third and Charlie Buckingham (USA) is fourth.

With a second in the final full-fleet race of the regatta, Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) put themselves in a strong position going into tomorrow’s Medal Race in the 49erFX. They have a 12-point lead over Rio 2016 gold medalists Martine Soffiatti Grael and Kahene Kunze (BRA) and Charlotte Dobson and Saskia Tidey (GBR). With fourth place 20 points further behind, the medalists are all but locked in. The final order will be decided tomorrow.

Erik Heil and Thomas Ploessel (GER) had their worst result of the regatta in the second of three races in the 49er class. But they won the other two and will carry an 11.7-point lead into the Medal Race. They are guaranteed at least a silver medal, Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell (GBR) are second while countrymen James Peters and Fynn Sterritt (GBR) are third.

Overnight leader Radoslaw Furmanski (POL) struggled in today’s three races in the Men’s RS:X class, but he’s still at the top of the leaderboard thanks to his strong start to the regatta and a tiebreaker, which positions him provisionally ahead of Pierre le Coq (FRA). Mateo Sanz Lanz (SUI) is third, just four points back. With just 20 points separating first from 10th, there is the potential for the results to shift around quite a bit in tomorrow’s double-points Medal Race.

It’s equally as tight at the top of the Women’s RS:X class, where two points separate Yunxiu Lu (CHN) in first from Charline Picon (FRA) in third. Katy Spychakov (ISR) is second. The scoring mechanics of the Medal Race, which is worth double points and also counts as the tiebreaker means those three sailors are effectively tied for the lead. The back half of the top 10 is a little more spread out. Only Zofia Noceti-Klepacka (POL) has a realistic chance of breaking into the medals.

Jonathan Lobert (FRA) and Rio 2016 bronze medalist Caleb Paine (USA) picked up the day’s race wins. Lobert is poised to strike in fourth but Paine only has an outside chance to qualify for Sunday’s Medal Race. He is 17th overall, 13 points off tenth. Tapio Nirrko (FIN) and Max Salminen (SWE) swapped places at the head of the fleet. But with potentially three races tomorrow there’s a lot of opportunity remaining.

Paige Railey showed again that experience counts, both in terms of time in the Laser Radial and time on tricky Biscayne Bay. She won two races today, finished fifth in a third, and will carry a nine-point lead into the final day of full-fleet racing. Dongshuang Zhang (CHN) won the third race and is currently second. Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) is third, 27 points off the lead. Railey is currently throwing out a black flag disqualification, which does make her margin for error in tomorrow’s final two races a little narrower than some of the other top sailors.

With an eighth and a third, the Swedish team of Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergström has built a 4-point lead in the Men’s 470. Naoki Ichino and Takashi Hasegawa (JPN) won the day’s second race and moved into second while Jordi Xammar Hernandez and Nicolás Rodríguez García-Paz had the best overall day with a first and a fifth and are now in third.

Fabienne Oster and Anatasiya Winkel (GER) have been a model of consistency in the Women’s 470 fleet. They have yet to win a race, but have finished no worse than sixth. With six races down, and possibly three more tomorrow before Sunday’s Medal Race, the German team has a four-point lead over Fernanda Oliveira and Ana Luiza Barbachan (BRA) and a six-point advantage over Hannah Mills and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR).

49er, 49erFX, Nacra 17 and the RS:X windsurfer Medal Races will be live across World Sailing’s YouTube and Facebook from 12:00 local time on Saturday 2 February. Fleet racing for the remaining fleets starts at 10:30 local time.

RESULTADOS PARCIALES CLICK ACÁ

El Trofeo Princesa Sofía Iberostar estrenará clase mixta en vistas a los Juegos de París 2024.

Fuente info Trofeo Princesa Sofía Iberostar

El 50 Trofeo Princesa Sofía Iberostar estrenará clase mixta en vistas a los Juegos de París 2024
1 February 2019

La regata mallorquina empieza a aplicar los requerimientos de igualdad de género que solicita el Comité Olímpico Internacional.

El Trofeo Princesa Sofía Iberostar, una de las regatas de clases olímpicas más importantes del mundo, vuelve a marcar tendencia y se convierte en la primera competición náutica en aplicar los criterios de igualdad de género que reclama el Comité Olímpico Internacional. El primer paso se dará en la edición del 50º aniversario de la prueba balear, con la introducción de las tripulaciones mixtas en la clase doble 470.

Del 29 de marzo al 6 de abril unos mil deportistas de alrededor de 55 países se darán cita en aguas de la bahía de Palma, repartidos en las tradicionales diez flotas olímpicas. Pero a los 470 Masculino y Femenino se sumarán esta vez los 470 Mixto, tripulados por parejas formadas por un hombre y una mujer, pudiendo ser ambos tanto patrón como tripulante.

La nueva categoría, que en el Sofía Iberostar regateará con la flota de 470 Masculino, tendrá su debut mundial en competición en aguas mallorquinas. Será la primera prueba de fuego de cara a los Juegos Olímpicos de París 2024, donde será incluida en el programa olímpico por primera vez, siguiendo las directrices del COI para fomentar la igualdad de género en el deporte.

“Para el Sofía Iberostar es un honor y un orgullo ser una vez más pioneros, fruto de la relación cercana que tenemos con las clases y con los regatistas, y que ha dado pie a que se nos conozca como ‘la regata de los regatistas’ -señala el director general de la competición balear, Ferran Muniesa-. Ha sido la clase internacional 470 quien nos ha solicitado la introducción de esta novedad, con el objetivo de que las tripulaciones puedan empezar a probar en competición en vistas ya a París 2024”.

Así, las primeras tripulaciones mixtas de 470, regatistas juveniles en su mayoría y de países como Gran Bretaña, Suiza y España, entre otros, probarán suerte en la nueva categoría a seis años de la meta olímpica. En esta carrera deberán superar varios obstáculos, y el primero será encontrar el equilibrio a bordo con la nueva pareja.

“Con el Nacra 17, que también es mixto, ya se ha visto que no siempre es fácil formar tripulaciones de hombre y mujer, porque hay un componente psicológico importante, pero el COI está decidido a impulsar la igualdad de género en el deporte, y desde el Sofía Iberostar lo apoyamos, conscientes de la necesidad de configurar una sociedad más justa e igualitaria a todos los niveles”, añade Muniesa.

El Club Nàutic S’Arenal será la sede de los 470 en el 50 Trofeo Princesa Sofía Iberostar, junto a los Finn, los 49er y 49er FX y, novedad este año, los RS:X masculino y femenino. El Club Marítimo San Antonio de la Playa (donde se ubicarán los Laser, Laser Radial y Nacra 17) y el Real Club Náutico de Palma (cruceros y monotipos) son también organizadores y sedes de la regata mallorquina, que celebrará medio siglo de vida en una edición histórica, en el terreno deportivo por la excepcional participación que se espera, tanto en cantidad como en calidad, y en el terreno social por la celebración de varios actos conmemorativos paralelos.

World Cup Series Miami, día 3.






Fuente info World Sailing

Hempel World Cup Series Miami a test of mental fortitude
For immediate release: 01/31/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

Today’s second race for the Finn class at the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series Miami was something of a microcosm of the regatta so far. It was all about surviving the storm and limiting the damage.

Only this wasn’t the traditional sort of storm, with the thrashing wind and the waves crashing over the deck. Rather, it was a sudden deluge of rain that sent the breeze into a game of hide and seek during the crucial first leg.

So far it’s been that sort of an event for the 29 sailors competing in the Finn. Light air limited the Finn sailors to just two races over the first two days. Today was better, but with the rain cells rolling through the second of three races, the regatta has been a test of mental fortitude more than physical strength.

“Today we were sailing in a little bit lighter breeze than we have expected and we had some dark rain clouds coming in over the course that were really hard to manage,” said Max Salminen (SWE). “Those races you have to somehow survive and wait for the more solid breeze that came in around noon, maybe, 1 p.m.”

Salminen, who won a gold medal as a Star class crew at London 2012 and finished sixth in the Finn at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, is tied on points for the overall lead with fellow Scandinavian sailor Tapio Nirkko (FIN). Jonathan Lobert (FRA), Nils Theunnick (SUI) and Luke Muller (USA) round out the top five.

“I’m super happy to have survived the light tricky races and to be going good in the breeze,” said Salminen.

Muller, who grew up dodging South Florida rain cells, took advantage of the adverse conditions in Race 2 to record his first win of the regatta.

“I applied a little of my storm-cell knowledge in the bay and that was kind of fun, bringing me back to my youth sailing days,” said Muller. “There was a massive storm cell. We had good pressure for the first half of the [first] upwind and then it started just dropping out of the sky and coming back up, and we were going through 40-plus-degree windshifts. I was really just focusing on staying in the pressure and that seemed to go alright.”

The Finn fleet is a little smaller than in previous years, but Salminen sees no drop off in the talent level.

“There’s a lot of the good guys that we’re expecting to sail the Olympics here,” he said. “And also the smaller fleet is perfect training for the Olympics where we are only 19 on the starting line.”

Most major Finn regattas can see fleets of 80 to 100 boats, and a starting line that might stretch the better part of a half a mile, which requires a different approach.

Charline Picon (FRA) is the defending Olympic champion in the Women’s RS:X. But she came into the Hempel World Series Cup Miami with some doubt about her current standing in the fleet. She is still building back her form after having a daughter less than two years ago.

“For me, going here, it was the beginning of the season so I have to see where I am in the fleet after the winter,” said Picon. “I didn’t train on the RS:X since the beginning of December. I did physical training; because of the pregnancy I have to work on that. I know the other girls did a lot of work [on the RS:X], I was a questioning myself a little bit about where I am in the fleet.”

Picon’s day didn’t start well at all. She felt a little under the weather leaving the dock and then she and the rest of the fleet had to wait out the rainstorm on the water. Once the rain passed, the wind filled in at 8 to 12 knots, right in her sweet spot. But the first race didn’t go as planned.

“It was not easy with the wind moving a lot, going to the right,” said Picon. “The first race I had a good start, but I couldn’t tack for the right, so I was on the wrong side. I did a bit mistake on the downwind because I wasn’t very focused. I do a jibe and [Lilian de Geus] was just there, so I had to do a penalty and I finished 12th or so. So not a good race, but after that I had to do my best and I managed two good races. I had good speed, good downwinds, very good starts, so I’m happy with my day and the form at the moment.”

The strong finish to the day put Picon into second place in the overall standings, after five races, two points behind Zofia Noceti-Kelpacka (POL) and four points in strong of Katy Spychakov (ISR) in third.

While Picon is gauging herself against the fleet as a whole, she’s also keeping a close eye on other French sailors. Last year, in Picon’s absence, Hélène Noesmoen (FRA) won this regatta. And Lucie Belbeoch (FRA) has shown potential as well.

“This year is the year for the selection and there is only one place [in Tokyo in 2020],” said Picon. “I am in front, but I have to be careful and I have to push myself every time to show I am the boss. We don’t know yet [the selection process], I think a committee of selection. I hope not a long selection process because you can lose a lot of energy. I hope to do a good job this season and [leave] no question for the committee.”

Four races today have the 49er class nearly back on schedule. In no fleet has consistency been more elusive. With a pair of race wins to close out the day—after a 17th and an eighth to start it—Rio 2016 bronze medalists Erik Heil and Thomas Ploessel (GER) are now winning by just over six points. The pair was granted average points for their first race, which accounts for the fractional score. Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell (GBR) are second with Sime Fantela and Mihovil Fantela (CRO) in third. While there’s a significant point spread between first and seventh, the gap between seventh and 14th is much tighter, which will set up a particularly fierce battle tomorrow as everyone aims for a place in the top 10 and a chance to compete in the Medal Race.

Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) held on to their lead in the 49erFX after a fifth and an 18th, which they discard, from two races. The Kiwis are five points clear of Great Britain’s Charlotte Dobson and Saskia Tidey who claimed a first and a fifth. Ida Marie Baad Nielsen and Marie Thusgaard Olsen (DEN) took the other victory and they are 16th overall.

A pair of Polish sailors have taken command of the Men’s RS:X class. Radoslaw Furmanski (POL) was the top sailor of the day with a fifth, a first, and a second, lifting him 10 points clear of countryman Pawel Tarnowski (POL). Matteo Sanz Lanz (SUI) is third, currently on the wrong side of a tiebreaker with Tarnowski.

Fresher breezes meant lots of foiling for the Nacra 17 fleet, which ripped through four races today and is on track to complete its scheduled 12 before Saturday’s Medal Race. The increased also restored some normalcy to the standings after a lot of inconsistency over the first five races. The top two boats have started to edge away from the fleet. Samuel Albrecht and Gabriela Nicolino de Sá (BRA) maintain the overall lead, but have just four points over Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS). Third place, John Gimson and Anna Burnet (GBR) is 16 points further back.

The Men’s and Women’s 470 were unable to race on Wednesday but two good races today has seen their leaderboards take shape.

Agnieszka Skrzypulec and Jolanta Ogar (POL) won both races on Tuesday but did enough to hold on to their lead. They posted a fifth and a 22nd, which they discard. They are on seven points, three clear of Hannah Mills and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) who won the final race of the day. China’s Mengxi Wei and Yani Xu took the first win of the day and are down in 14th.

American favourites Stu McNay and Dave Hughes moved up to first overall in the Men’s 470, level on points with overnight leaders Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergström (SWE).

The day’s race wins went to the fifth-placed Chinese team of Zangjun Xu and Chao Wang as well as Martin Wrigley and James Taylor (GBR) who are in 15th.

The Laser fleet got into the business end of their competition as Final Series racing commenced. Following two days of qualifying, featuring four races, the top 51-boats advanced to the gold fleet as the hunt for the podium commenced.

Three races were held but scoring for race seven was under review at 18:00 local time. But after race five and six, Norway’s Hermann Tomasgaard was the best performer, continuing his qualification series form in the gold fleet.

He finished fifth in the first race of the day and followed it up with a second. He has a provisional score of fifth in the third race. Tomasgaard’s fifth was his worst result so far and as a result, he discards it. Many of his rivals around him count high scores so the odds are stacked firmly in the young Norwegians favour at this point.

Race wins went the way of William De Smet (BEL), Lorenzo Chiavarini (GBR) and Juan Ignacio Maegli Aguero (GUA).

Consistency is hard to come by in the 59-boat Laser Radial fleet and the initiative is swinging back and forth.

Alison Young (GBR) advanced to first overall following a discarded 14th and a seventh. Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) is second overall, a point off Young, following a win in the final race of the day. However, Rindom came 49th in the race prior and discards the score so will have to tread carefully over the coming days.

Lithuania’s Viktoriha Andrulyte snapped up the other race win and is third.

Racing resumes once again at the earlier time of 10:00. The 49er, 49erFX, Nacra and RS:X fleets will sail their final day of qualification ahead of Saturday’s Medal Races.

RESULTADOS PARCIALES CLICK ACÁ

World Cup Series Miami, día 2. En Nacra 17, Lange/Carranza trepan al tercer puesto.






Fuente info World Sailing

Strong starts converted into race wins at Hempel World Cup Series Miami

For immediate release: 01/30/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

It was a rich get richer sort of day at the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series Miami, and during each of the first two races for the Women’s 49erFX fleet, Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) found themselves in very liquid situations—financially speaking—converting strong starts into race wins with relative ease.

“Starts were really important today,” said Maloney. “In the first two races, we kind of got away, and it made a big difference for the first beat. The rest of the race was a lot easier. For the last race we were kind of back in the pack and decision-making and tight boat-on-boat situations were a lot harder. Just getting a little bit of a clear lane and away from the fleet in the first half of the first beat was pretty beneficial.”

Their result in today’s third race was a 10th, but with the throwout applied and yesterday’s second added to the total, the antipodean pair find themselves 11 points clear of second place after two days of racing. Sophie Weguelin and Sophie Ainsworth (GBR) and Stephanie Roble and Margaret Shea (USA) are tied with 15 points, with the British team technically in second due to the tie-breaking protocol.

“It was pretty light and shifty,” said Maloney, when asked about the conditions they faced on Day 2 of the second stop on the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series, “and you were always on your toes. You could be confident in one side, but it was kind of the day that you wanted to be protecting both sides when you were in the lead because there was a little bit of snakes and ladders out there. Overall it was a fun day and we’re happy to come away with our scoreboard.”

The 49erFX is one of two Olympic classes that debuted at the 2016 Rio Games and the fleet continues to evolve as the sailors who were there from the beginning grow more comfortable with the nuances of skiff sailing and other talented sailors are lured in by the boat’s easy speed and strict one-design class rules.

“The class is becoming a bit older and there’s more depth in the fleet,” said Maloney, the Rio 2016 silver medallist. “The racing is closer and you can’t get away with a few things you used to be able to get away with. There’s definitely more depth and anything under 14 knots, the boats are going pretty similar speeds and it’s more tactical. There’s more of speed differential as it gets windier. As a fleet we’re getting a lot sharper and more aggressive on the start line. Our low speed boathandling control is a lot better than it used to be. You used to see the girls set up away from the line and more sail into it but now we’re just the same as the guys crabbing and getting a little more aggressive on the start line.”

After three races yesterday, the 49er was able to squeeze in just a single race. Benjamin Bildstein and David Hussl (AUT) won that lone race, but a tough first day has them mired in 15th place. The big winners of the day were Nevin Snow and Mac Agnese (USA) who finished second in the race and jumped into the overall lead, with Day 1 leaders Sime Fantela and Mihovil Fantela (CRO) in second by a point and James Peters and Fynn Sterritt (GBR) in third, two points further back.

The Laser fleet finished its qualifying series with two more races and will start Gold and Silver Fleet racing tomorrow. Hermann Tamasgaard (NOR) added a first and a fourth to his scoreline and is currently winning by three points over Sam Meech (NZL) and seven points over William de Smet (BEL). But this fleet is particularly tightly packed with just five points separating defending OIympic gold medalist Tom Burton (AUS) in fifth with Jean Baptiste Bernaz (FRA) in 15th.

“The regatta really starts tomorrow with everyone in Gold Fleet,” said Chris Barnard (USA) who is currently seventh.

Monika Mikkola (FIN) won the only Laser Radial race and is leading the fleet with two races in the books. But it’s tight at the top. Mikkola is tied on points with Alison Young (GBR) and Zoe Thomson (AUS) is just a point behind that pair.

“I just got some pressure first and was able to make it simple,” said Mikkola of today’s race. “It was a bit of a combination of being in right place at the right time and a bit of luck. We’ve only done two races now, so it’s all open. And all the girls here are phenomenal. It’s going to be really hard. Tomorrow there’s supposed to be a bit more wind so you’ll probably see the more usual names at the top of the leaderboard.”

The light wind specialists in the Men’s and Women’s RS:X came to the forefront in challenging light breeze on Biscayne Bay.

Chinese racers have always been known to excel in light wind and Mengfan Gao was the personification of this statement out on the race track.

In a variable 5- to 8-knot breeze, Gao grabbed the lead on the first upwind and never relinquished it, finishing more than 20 seconds ahead of Poland’s Maciej Kluszczyński. The race win propels Gao up to first overall, one point ahead of Thomas Goyard (FRA) after three races.

London 2012 Olympic bronze medallist Zofia Noceti Klepacka (POL) also led the single Women’s RS:X race from start to finish and moves up to second as a result. China also has a leader in the Women’s fleet in the shape of Yunxiu Lu, who is on a run of three consecutive bronze medal finishes at international events, after she finished third behind Klepacka and Bryony Shaw (GBR).

The 27-boat Finn fleet were only able to sail one race in 6-8 knots of breeze. The phrase, “snakes and ladders,” could not be more appropriate for the fleet as sailors shuffled throughout the race.

In the end, Anders Pedersen (NOR) took the race win to advance up to second overall. Tapio Nirkko (FIN) snapped up a second and holds top spot after two races.

The Finn fleet will sail three races on Thursday, starting at 10:00 local time, in a bid to catch up on races.

The Nacra 17 class was able to squeeze in two races toward the end of the day. The Brazilian team of Samuel Albrecht and Gabriela Nicolino de Sá (BRA) continued to control the fleet with a fourth and a first and now has an eight-point lead over defending regatta champions Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS) and Rio 2016 gold medalists Santiago Lange and Cecilia Carranza Saroli (ARG). Both teams have 15 points.

The Men’s and Women’s 470 were unable to get a race in today due to the light winds.

Racing continues on Thursday 31 January at 10:00 local time with another packed schedule in a bid to catch up on races lost.

RESULTADOS PARCIALES CLICK ACÁ

World Cup Series Miami, día 1. Los dos Nacra 17 argentinos en el top ten.





Fuente info World Sailing

Sailors put training into practice at Hempel World Cup Series Miami

For immediate release: 01/29/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

After nearly a month of training and competition on Biscayne Bay, many of the top sailors competing in the 2019 Hempel World Cup Series Miami have seen just about every wind condition Miami has to offer.

But that doesn’t make it any easier to race when the breeze is out of the west, a direction notorious for lower velocity and little consistency when it comes to the wind direction.

“The wind was constantly shifting to the right [side of the course],” says 49er skipper Sime Fantela (CRO), “but the pressure was staying left, so it was not an easy decision where to sail. The ones who managed to tack when they wanted and have their line, they were winning.”

Fantela speaks from first-hand experience. With a 3-13-2, Fantela, who sails with his younger brother Mihovil as a crew, emerged relatively unscathed from the opening day of the regatta and will carry a three-point lead over Diego Botín le Chever and Iago López Marra (ESP) in second and a seven-point advantage over James Peters and Fynn Sterritt (GBR) in third.

Of the three races today, Sime Fantela was most pleased with the second one. The short course format used by the 49er class made passing a challenge.

“The start was not that great, and we managed to come back,” he says. “We rounded [the first mark] I think in 23rd and managed to finish around 12 to 15. It’s quite tough with 40 boats on the start and the racecourse was a short course so not so many clear lanes. You have to dig your way through.”

Like the Fantela brothers, the team of Botín le Chever and López Marra also struggled in the second race, finishing 16th. But a win in the first race and a fourth in the final one more than balanced that one hiccup.

“Try to make a good start and then see what’s going on and try to catch the best shift,” said López Marra when asked about the key to a strong race today. “The seabreeze and the gradient wind [were fighting one another] and that’s why it was so shifty.”

As Spain was unable to qualify for a country berth in the 49er class at last summer’s Hempel Sailing World Championships in Aarhus, Denmark, the top priority for Botín le Chever and López Marra is to earn that berth this year at the world championships in New Zealand at the end of the year.

That’s one box that has been ticked by Sime and Mihovil Fantela. They are the defending world champions after a breakout performance in Aarhus and have punched their ticket to Tokyo. However, as they are relatively new to the class—Sime won a gold medal in the 470 in Rio 2016 while Mihovil sailed in the RS:X class until 2016—they are not letting that success go to their heads.

“We still have the same goal, the same focus, the same will to train and improve,” said Sime Fantela. “We missed some strong wind training [last year] so we’re trying to look this season for the strong wind places to go and train. Lots of training, lots of days out of home and looking forward to Tokyo.”

The 30-boat 49erFX fleet followed the 49ers later on in the afternoon and in a shifting and variable breeze, just one race could be completed.

Sophie Weguelin and Sophie Ainsworth (GBR) found some form and led the race from the top mark through to the finish. Alex Maloney and Molly Meech (NZL) and Germany’s defending champions Victoria Jurczok and Anika Lorenz (GER) followed.

American favourites Stu McNay and Dave Hughes avoided any major pitfalls on the water and stand in third place, of 37 boats, after two races in the Men’s 470.

“We rolled a third and a fifth today,” says McNay. “We did the big picture things right, but made a couple small errors. We did lose a couple of points. Dave and I have been sailing for a long time, we’ve raced in Miami for years. It’s a challenging venue, so we’re always glad when we walk away from a shifty day like this with scores we can carry forward.”

For Hughes, this regatta as close to a home event as he’ll ever get, something he tries not to take for granted.

“This is always a lovely event and always kind of the way to start the year for us,” he says. “I live in Miami, so it’s got a special meaning for that. It’s a bit of an added stress because it is a home event and we are always looking to be proper hosts to everybody who comes here, off the water, at least. But it’s wonderful because all of our international friends come to our home. It’s a treat and for us this is just a staple of our sailing and our Olympic careers.”

With a seventh at last summer’s Hempel Sailing World Championships in Aarhus, Denmark, McNay and Hughes qualified for the United States for the berth in the Men’s 470 class at the Tokyo 2020 regatta. Now they are focused on making sure they are the team to claim that berth. They’ve been down this road before, having sailed together in the Rio 2016 regatta — McNay sailed with a different partner in Beijing 2008 and London 2012 — but that doesn’t make it easy.

“We’re trying not to be distracted, trying to keep our priorities in line,” says McNay. “Not let one piece of equipment become distracting, not let one detail of a skill become distracting. Give our prioritization to each item, as it deserves, as it will help us most, which is a challenge because perspective is the easiest thing to lose when your head is this deep in something.”

Anton Dahlberg and Fredrik Bergström (SWE) hold the early advantage in the Men’s 470 on five points. They are two points clear of Italy’s Giacomo Ferrari and Giulio Calabrò and a further point ahead of the Americans.

The Italians took the first race win of the day and Japan’s fifth placed team of Tetsuya Isozaki and Akira Takayanagi sealed the second.

Among the fleets that got in two or more races, only the Women’s 470 duo of Agnieszka Skrzypulec and Jolanta Zohar (POL) had a perfect day, winning both races. They trailed around just two of 12 marks and currently have a six-point lead over Fabienne Oster and Anastasiya Winkel (GER) and a nine-point advantage over Benedetta di Salle and Alessandra Dubbini (ITA).

Spain’s Angel Granda-Roque and China’s Bing Ye are tied on nine points apiece in the Men’s RS:X after a tough day on the water. In light winds the sailors had to pump their sails hard to take the initiative. Granda-Roque took an eighth and a first with Ye securing a fifth and a fourth. The first victory of the event went to France’s Thomas Goyard but a blackflag in the second pushed him down to 29th overall.

Just one race was possible in the Women’s RS:X and China’s Yunxiu Lu took the win. She was followed by Italy’s Flavia Tartaglini and Israel’s Yarden Isaak.

Brazil’s Samuel Albrecht and Gabriela Nicolino de Sa shone in the Nacra 17, snapping up two out of three victories. The pair thrived in the 7-9 knot breeze on the Echo racing area and discard the seventh they picked up in race two.

2018 Miami gold medallists Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin (AUS) took the day’s other race win and are tied with Spain’s Iker Martinez and Olga Maslivets (ESP) for second on five points.

London 2012 Olympic bronze medallist Jonathan Lobert (FRA) picked up the single race win in the 25-boat Finn fleet. The towering Frenchman fought hard against Croatia’s Josip Olujic throughout the race and the momentum swung back and forth. Lobert held the lead early on in the race but the Croatian hit back to claim it at the midway point. Lobert advanced on the final run and took the race win by just two seconds.

The Laser fleet is the largest in Miami with 101 boats registered to race. As a result, the first two days of competition are qualifying races before the top sailors move into the gold fleet to decide who qualifies for Sunday’s Medal Race.

The top ranked sailors were all aiming to get off to good starts and they did exactly that. In the yellow fleet, Rio 2016 bronze medallist Sam Meech (NZL) and World Cup Final medallist Hermann Tomasgaard (NOR) took a race win apiece with another single digit finish. Meech leads on three points with the Norwegian second on four. Matt Wearn (AUS) posted a 5-4 in the yellow fleet and is third.

In the blue fleet, consistency was at a premium. Joaquin Blanco (ESP) and Elliot Merceron (GBR) were the top performers and are fourth and fifth overall. Blue fleet victories went to William de Smet (BEL) who is 22nd and the 18th placed Yuri Hummel (NED).

The Laser Radial class was able to get in just a single race, which was won by Dongshuang Zhang (CHN) with Zoe Thomson (AUS) in second and Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) in third.

Racing resumes on Wednesday 30 January at 10:30 local time. The fleets who were unable to complete a full schedule of racing on Tuesday will sail an additional race, minus the Men’s and Women’s RS:X.

RESULTADOS PARCIALES CLICK ACÁ

Medemblik Regatta 2019, se abre el período de inscripción.


Copyright Sander van der Borch

Fuente info Medemblik Regatta

Registration 35th edition of the Medemblik Regatta open

January 29th 2019, the Netherlands – The 35th edition of the Medemblik Regatta will be organized from Tuesday 21th to Saturday 25th of May 2019. Registration for the event opened Tuesday, January 29th. Over the years many Olympic- European- and World Champions have raced at the Regatta in Medemblik. And after the success of last year, the Youth Windsurfers are invited again as well.

The Medemblik Regatta is an annual event which is organized from the Regatta Center Medemblik. It’s the only Olympic sailing event in the Netherlands where the international top sailors are represented. Last year we welcomed Dutchies like Dorian van Rijsselberghe, Kiran Badloe, Lilian de Geus, Annemiek Bekkering and Annette Duetz. Among the international top sailors that travelled to Medemblik, we saw: Yoav Cohen, Zofia Noceti-Klepacka, Charlotte Dobson with Saskia Tidey, Elliot Hanson and Echavarri Erasun with Pacheco van Rijnsoever.

An inspiration for RS:X Youth
After last year’s success, the RS:X U19 class is invited again at the Medemblik Regatta. It’s one of the few events that invite the youth, Dutch RS:X coach Aaron McIntosh: “By inviting the youth at the Medemblik Regatta, they have a chance to race in a big fleet with a high level of competition. And they’re also racing in the same event as the seniors, so hopefully, they can learn from them and get inspired. I hope more events will follow this example and invite the youth to participate, the only options they have now are mostly European and World Championships next to the Youth Olympic Games.”

Yoav Cohen, RS:X Men gold medal of last year, is looking forward to this season. “I never expected to win last year in Medemblik, it was my second championship in the senior fleet and a top 10 was my goal at the beginning of the week. I’ve learned a lot last year, in stronger winds I found it hard to compete. That’s what we’ve been working on this winter. Racing in strong winds and gaining some kilos and muscles. I hope to see my progression in the events this season.”

Spectacular Nacra 17
The Nacra 17 at the Medemblik Regatta is known for some close racing. Last year the battle for the podium wasn’t finished till the medal race. Top sailors like the New Zealand duo Gemma Jones and Jason Saunders are expected to race at the regatta again. Next to the many years of experience, we’ll welcome some new talents that switched from the Nacra 15. like the Dutch duo Laila van der Meer and Bjarne Bouwer, they’ve successfully raced in the Nacra 15 at the Yout Olympic Games last year. Now they’re ready for the senior fleet and will compete for the first time in the Nacra 17 at the Medemblik Regatta.

Back in Medemblik
This year the 470 class will be back at the Medemblik Regatta. With some new exciting duos in the female class. Lobke Berkhout, former Olympic 470 sailors, is back in the 470. She’s sailing with Afrodite Zegers, who formed a team with Anneloes van Veen till last season. Van Veen is now teaming up with Mandy Mulder, who we know from the Nacra 17 and Yngling class.

Medal race stays in boundaries
Next to these classes, the Laser, Laser Radial, Finn, 49er and 49erFX are invited as well. The sailors in these classes enjoyed the medal races in boundaries last year. Daphne van der Vaart, gold medallist in the Laser Radial class: “Racing with those boundaries made the races more exciting, at some points I wanted to keep on sailing a straight line, but then I had to tack because those boundaries were getting really close.” In the 49erFX class, Annette Duetz saw a big advantage for the spectators. “It’s pretty fun to race in those boundaries. It’s like a normal race, you just have to keep an extra eye out. And spectators can get really close to the racing area this way.” This year the boundaries will be part of the medal race again.

Registration for the Medemblik Regatta is open!