AC36, uno menos antes de empezar. Altus Challenge no será desafiante de la Copa America.

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31st May 2019
MALTA ALTUS CHALLENGE WITHDRAWS FROM AC36

The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has advised that today they received a notice from the Royal Malta Yacht Club officially withdrawing the Malta Altus Challenge from the 36th America’s Cup.

“This is a disappointing outcome.” said Grant Dalton, “The Malta Altus Challenge had a strong foundation with some highly experienced and reputable America’s Cup personnel linked to the team.

So, for them to pull out is not just a shame for the event but also for those people that have worked so hard trying to get this challenge to the start line. We hope they will continue to build on their foundation over the next 18 months with a view to the future and challenging for the 37th America’s Cup.”

“We are wanting the Prada Cup to include as many teams as possible.” Said Laurent Esquier CEO of the Challenger of Record.
“While we have done all we can to support the Malta Altus Challenge, they haven’t been able to bring together all the layers of complexity that are needed to continue with an America’s Cup challenge. We are still guaranteed to have an exciting and highly competitive Prada Cup to select the final challenger to race against Emirates Team New Zealand in the Match.”

The two remaining late challengers, Stars + Stripes USA and DutchSail will confirm their ongoing commitment to the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada by July 1st.

2019 Volvo 49er, 49erFX y Nacra 17 European Championships, día 2. En Nacra 17, Majdalani/Bosco suben al séptimo lugar.


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WavEYMOUTH!!!
49er: A Bag of Bullets for Burling

They’re not long back in the boat after their two-and-a-half year holiday in the America’s Cup and the Volvo Ocean Race, but already Peter Burling and Blair Tuke are back at the top in the 49er after firing three bullets in a row today. “Nice day out,” smiled a typically straightforward Burling, checking carefully over every part of the rig after a testing outing for the 96-boat fleet.

It’s not that it was uber-windy, but the easterly breeze had kicked up some big waves in Weymouth Bay, offering plenty of opportunity for an unwanted high-speed pitchpole. The Antipodeans are muscling in on the European party, both Kiwis and Aussies enjoying the big breeze, big wave conditions. The only European team in the top four is Spain’s Diego Botin and Iago Lopez who were almost as dominant as the Kiwis in their third of the qualifying draw, scoring 2,1,1. “It’s so nice to be racing in good conditions again,” said Lopez. “Today was a great day for 49er sailing.”

The Spaniards are just a point off the Burling/Tuke lead, and just two points adrift of the Spanish are the Aussie brothers Will and Sam Phillips who scored three second places behind the unstoppable Kiwis. “Got to be pretty happy with that,” said Will after snapping at the heels of the reigning Olympic Champions all day. “Still a long list of things to work on, but we’re getting there with our starting and boat speed was pretty solid.” His favourite bit of the day was the two-sail blast back across Portland Harbour, back in the relative safety and comfort of the flat water after the lumpy challenge of the Bay.

Rio 2016 bronze medallists Erik Heil and Thomas Ploessel were fast out of the blocks in the morning, winning their first heat, but ran out of steam as the day progressed. “I was getting tired,” smiled Heil, sounding like a broken man. They pitchpoled in race two but recovered to a still respectable 10th place. “I was losing concentration because we were getting tired.” Then they capsized again in the final race of the afternoon, this time only managing an 18th. Despite their topsy-turvy moments, the Germans hold on to 7th place overall.

Austria’s Benjamin Bildstein and David Hussl struggled in yesterday’s conditions but got their mojo back on day two, scores of 1,1,5 lifting them to 12th overall. Great Britain’s Chris Taylor and Sam Batten had just put together a good set of results – 7,4,9 – and were enjoying the ride back home across the harbour when their forestay snapped at the top terminal. “The rig dropped back but the boom sat on the leeward wing and sort of supported the mast until we had time to re-tie the kite halyard as a temporary forestay,” said Taylor. So no real harm done, and a big day’s sailing that has planted a big grin on every face of the 49er fleet.

49erFX: Britain and Brazil tied after flat-water harbour blast

The two halves of the 49erFX qualification series took place today in a 15-18 knots easterly in Portland Harbour, delivering spectacularly fast conditions for the women’s skiff fleet. While Charlotte Dobson and Saskia Tidey have upped their game significantly in lighter conditions, the British duo were back in their favourite breeze – strong and gusty. Scores of 1,1,2 lift them to top of the leaderboard, tied on points with second-placed Brazilians, Martine Grael and Kahena Kunze.

A container ship near the Portland shore on the right-hand side of the course prevented a straightforward tack into the corner, forcing a couple more tacks out of the teams. “We quite liked the container ship there,” said Dobson. “It made it a bit more interesting. The gusts were pretty hard though, you couldn’t see them coming. There’s quite a lot of weight in the wind and being so close to the shore there wasn’t much warning before the next gust hit. So it kept you on your toes, you couldn’t really relax for a moment.”

The Brits’ closest rival on their side of the draw is the young Swedish team who were leading after day one, Vilma Bobeck and Malin Tengstrom, who continue to tear round the track at high speed, scoring 7,4,1 from the day. “We train with them a lot,” said Dobson. “They’re probably a bit faster than us in the breeze but we managed to be a bit more consistent on the race course.”

The other side of the draw saw a three-way battle play out between three 49erFX World Champions past and present. The reigning Olympic Champions, Grael and Kunze, had the best of it with 1,1,3. The Olympic silver medallists from New Zealand, Alex Maloney and Molly Meech, notched up an ever-improving 3,2,1, lifting them to fifth overall, one place behind the other high performer of the day, the reigning World Champions Annemieke Bekkering and Annette Duetz of the Netherlands. The Dutch were still grinning after a fun day on the water that brought them scores of 2,3,2. “We love that stuff,” said Bekkering. “We don’t get to sail in such flat water very often, and the boats were flying today.”

Bekkering and Duetz are definitely enjoying the weather so far in Weymouth, although the breeze is set to drop in the coming days. They’re strong in all conditions, but so far the higher wind – which floated between 15 and 20 knots – is making life harder for their rivals for Dutch Olympic selection. A few weeks ago Odile van Aanholt and Marieke Jongens won the Hempel Sailing World Cup regatta in Genoa, Italy, in very light winds. This gives them a significant advantage going into the second and final part of the Olympic trials here in Weymouth. So far, Bekkering and Duetz are doing a good job of staying in the fight, but that is exactly what the reigning World Champions need to do if they hope to stay in contention for that coveted place at Tokyo 2020.

Nacra 17: Gimson and Burnet in an Italian sandwich

Ruggero Tita and Caterina Banti (ITA) continued their relentless march at the top of the leaderboard, notching up two more first places in their qualifying group, only falling foul in the last race of the afternoon. “We were fast upwind and going well downwind in the waves,” said Banti. “We just didn’t start quite so well in the last race and couldn’t pull through.”

The only race the Italians didn’t win was taken instead by Great Britain’s Ben Saxton and Nikki Boniface who enjoyed getting out in the big waves after a few light-airs regattas. “We did a lot of training over the winter in strong winds and big waves,” said Saxton. “It took us a race to remember what to do, but it felt good after that.” The 15 knot breeze did drop away to more like 10 knots by the end of the afternoon, although was still testing enough for the overworked crews doing all the gunnel running fore and aft along the 17ft hulls.

There were certainly enough gnarly moments to catch out some of the crews crashing into the back of the nastier waves. Two teams wiped out their aluminium bowsprits, leaving them without the ability to fly the gennaker downwind. One of those was the Spanish team of Tara Pacheco and Florian Trittel who failed to get a result in the middle race but made amends with a 2,3 in the other two heats to sit in fourth overall.

On the other side of qualification, another British crew – John Gimson and Anna Burnet – sailed a stellar day to rack up 1,1,2 and rise to second overall. The British team now find themselves sandwiched between two Italian crews, the leaders five points ahead and just a point behind in third overall, Vittorio Bissaro and Maelle Frascari.

Back in 15th place are Nathan and Haylee Outteridge, still discovering the quirks of the Nacra 17 in big waves. The Australian siblings made rapid progress last season in the flat water, and now it’s up to Nathan to see if he can master a different beast on these same Olympic waters that propelled him to 49er gold at London 2012. There’s a widespread acknowledgement that Weymouth Bay is proving a useful testing ground for the kind of big-wave swell that competitors might encounter at next year’s Olympic Regatta in Enoshima. Out of all the Olympic disciplines, the skiffs and the foiling catamaran find the waves the biggest challenge, so every day of experience in Weymouth Bay counts as a vital day of discovery on the road to Tokyo.

Nacra 17 Top 5 – Full Results
1            ITA       Ruggero Tita, Caterina Banti                    5
2            GBR       John Gimson, Anna Burnet                   10
3            SWE       Vittorio Bissaro, Maelle Frascari             11
4            ESP       Tara Pacheco, Florian Trittel                   13
5            DEN        Lin Cenholt, CP Lubeck                       13

49erFX Top 5 – Full Results
1            GBR       Charlotte Dobson, Saskia Tidey                 8
2            BRA       Martine Grael, Kahena Kunze                   8
3            SWE       Vilma Bobeck, Malin Tengstrom              10
4            NED       Annemiek Bekkering, Annette Duetz        10
5            NZL        Alex Maloney, Molly Meech                      14

49er Top 5 – Full Results
1            NZL       Peter Burling, Blair Tuke                             7
2            ESP       Diego Botin, Iago Mara Lopez                      8
3            AUS       Will Phillips, Sam Phillips                          10
4            NZL        Logan Dunning Beck, Oscar Gunn            12
5            GER       Justus Schmidt, Max Boeme                     18

AC36, se confirma la validez de los últimos tres desafíos.


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PRESS RELEASE

Arbitration Panel rules Late Challengers valid

15th March 2019

The America’s Cup Arbitration Panel decision finding all three Late Entry challenges to be valid has been released today.

The Challenger of Record and the Defender had already reached a settlement agreement under which the validity of the Challenges was accepted and issued a Protocol amendment allowing for the Late Entry to be paid by deferred instalments. However, despite this collaborative agreement, the New York Yacht Club elected to continue to pursue the case. This anti-competitive action has caused further delays and uncertainty for the teams and frustrated the Challenger of Record and the Defender who have been working together in the best interests of the event.

As a result of the delay there are now concerns as to the likelihood of the Maltese Malta Altus Challenge being able to continue. However, the Challenger of Record and the Defender continue to work with DutchSail and Stars & Stripes to enable them to make the start line in Auckland in 2021.

The Panel also found that the payment of entry fees is a condition to their being able to race in the America’s Cup not a condition of their being an accepted Challenger meaning that Entry fees have only to be paid before the first race of the competition.

AC36, a dos años de una nueva edición.

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ONLY 2 YEARS UNTIL THE 36th AMERICA’S CUP MATCH
6 March 2019

24 months, 104 weeks, 730 days

It seems like a long time, but this is the America’s Cup and time is the biggest issue- you never have enough of it.

Every day is important. Is two years long enough?

“Not even close, we could use four,” explains America’s Cup veteran and Skipper of American Magic, Terry Hutchinson.

“Every single day is already accounted for as we work and prepare for the 36th America’s Cup.”

Each of the teams will now be at varying stages of their individual design, development and testing in their respective campaigns towards 2021. But just what is going on behind closed doors right now will go a long way to defining success in two years’ time, according to Kevin Shoebridge, COO of the Defender, Emirates Team New Zealand.

“Historically, when you look back on who has won any America’s Cup, it is often decisions that have been made two years to 18 months previous that are the key to what your performance will be at the end when it matters.

A lot of the philosophy and direction that you take is often taken quite early. So, decisions we are making today, decisions we have just made with the design of the first boat could be critical to the outcome of the America’s Cup. So, there is no slow ramping up to the big decisions coming later on. The big decisions are now.”

With this in mind, it is anyone’s guess as to who is better placed at this point in time. Literally no one could know. But, according to four-time America’s Cup winner and INEOS Team UK CEO Grant Simmer, it’s not just making the right decisions, but how effectively you manage your time once they have been made, that matters.

“Normally if you manage your America’s Cup properly you run out of time at the same time you run out of money. You can sometimes find more money, but you can never find more time. So, managing time is a critical part of the program and this Cup is like any other – you have to time your developments to come online right at the end of the Cup.”

Sigue leyendo

AC36 Newsletter #1, primeros tests para el sistema de movimiento de los foils.

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AC36 NEWSLETTER #1

22nd February 2019

They say the years get faster and this is guaranteed in every America’s Cup cycle. 2018 has just flown by and it has already been almost one year since the AC75 Class Rule was published. More than enough time for teams to have dissected every detail and produce designs for their build teams to be well into production of their AC75.

Synonymous with the America’s Cup is secrecy and at this crucial time most of the work is going on behind the scenes and insight into what is really happening within the team bases is nigh on impossible. The picture, of course, will become clearer towards the middle of the year when boat shed doors will begin to open revealing the first iterations of the AC75.

The AC75 will be one of the most revolutionary boats ever seen and recently was awarded – ‘Foiling Design’ and ‘Foiling Innovation’ categories – during the Foiling Awards at the Museo della Scienza in Milan. Despite the 3D models and the animations, it is difficult to really understand the scale and the behaviour of these foiling machines.

A first hint of the real scale of the AC75 boats has been illustrated by the prototype of the foil cant system (FCS) in action. During a number of visits to Auckland each challenger representative has witnessed the one design FCS that will be supplied to each team.

“The scale of the AC75 is for sure something that people have no idea about. You can only realise this when you see it first-hand!” said Dimitri Despierre of NYYC American Magic.

Click above to watch the video

Almost two years out from the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada – the pressure is rising and the need to keep one step ahead of the game leads the teams to be very careful with the information they put out for the public. Let’s see what news they have so far this year…

Steinlager vuelve a ser sponsor oficial de Emirates Team New Zealand.

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Steinlager back onboard as Official Sponsor

Auckland, New Zealand – 21th February 2019

Emirates Team New Zealand is proud to have Steinlager return as an Official Sponsor and Official Beer Partner of Emirates Team New Zealand’s for the defence of the 36th America’s Cup – here on home waters in Auckland in 2021.

Steinlager has been a long time supporter of Emirates Team New Zealand dating back to New Zealand’s first attempt at America’s Cup glory in 1987 in Fremantle.

Grant Dalton, Team New Zealand’s CEO, says: “Steinlager is a truly iconic Kiwi brand that has always stayed strong and believed in Emirates Team New Zealand and our quest for the America’s Cup. They’ve been on the boat for every win we’ve had, and we had Steinlager in our hand when we grasped the Cup in Bermuda in 2017 – a ritual we plan to keep alive in March 2021. Although it is always about the end result when we’re on the water, Steinlager helps to remind us to enjoy the journey.”

Rory Glass, Lion NZ Managing Director, says: “We are really excited and honoured to be back on the boat again. Steinlager has a long and proud history with yachting and with Emirates Team New Zealand, dating back to their first tilt at the Cup in 1986/87. 2021 will be our 35th year of support as the team endeavour to keep their hands on the oldest trophy in international sport.

We will be revealing more plans later in the year on how we will bring our sponsorship to life off the water as well – with epic environments for fans to support Emirates Team New Zealand across the country.”

In 2021, it will be over two decades since Emirates Team New Zealand successfully defended the America’s Cup on home waters. History now has the chance to repeat itself at one of New Zealand’s most iconic sporting events and Steinlager will be there on the boat again, and as the cold one that crew and fans can celebrate with when the hard work is done.

Let’s make history again!