36th America´s Cup, importante acuerdo de colaboración con World Sailing.

Fuente info WS

World Sailing and the America’s Cup look forward to the 36th edition

For immediate release: 10/31/2019
Issued on behalf of: World Sailing

World Sailing, the world governing body of the sport, and the Defender and Challenger of Record of the 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada have reached agreement for the next edition of the America’s Cup.

The agreement was signed at the World Sailing Annual Conference in Bermuda, where Emirates Team New Zealand representing the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron won the 35th edition in emphatic fashion.

Signing the agreement, World Sailing President Kim Andersen said, “As one of the pinnacle events within the sport, it is vital that World Sailing and the Defender and Challenger of Record work collaboratively to ensure a fair competition on the water.

“We have worked closely with Grant Dalton and Laurent Esquier on this agreement which will ensure the America’s Cup is delivered to the high standard the sailing community has come to expect. We look forward to continuing and strengthening our relationship with both the Defender and Challenger to ensure a memorable competition for fans of our sport.”

The agreement sees the America’s Cup re-established as a member of World Sailing’s family of Special Events. World Sailing will continue its role in ensuring the fairness and integrity of the America’s Cup through the appointment of Race Officials, the approval of the specialist Racing Rules of Sailing (America’s Cup Edition) and management of the anti-doping programme.

World Sailing, the Defender and Challenger of Record will also work together on implementing sustainability programmes throughout the Cup, Prada Cup Challenger Selection Series and other preliminary events. The organisations will also work closely together on promoting and enhancing the media coverage of the sport globally.

Commenting on the continuing partnership between World Sailing and the Defender, Grant Dalton, CEO of America’s Cup Events said, “For a sailing event of the magnitude of the America’s Cup, there is no end of detail which needs to be organised.

“But one of the most important foundations is to work with World Sailing to put in place the sanctioning agreement to help govern the rules on the water, which we are pleased to have now achieved with them.

“The agreement and terms are in line with previous America’s Cup cycles and we are looking forward to maintaining the long standing and valued relationship with World Sailing.”

Laurent Esquier, CEO of Challenger of Record 36 – the organisation responsible for organising the America’s Cup World Series, Christmas Race, and the Prada Cup Challenger Series – thanked the World Sailing President for making the sanctioning agreement possible.

“This agreement is a significant milestone in this 36th cycle of the America’s Cup and we are grateful for Kim Andersen’s unwavering support in bringing it to fruition,” Esquier said.

“As a World Sailing Special Event we have access to a vast pool of experience and expertise within the World Sailing organisation. We look forward to working closely with Kim and his team to deliver exciting world class competition at all the events in this 36th America’s Cup cycle.”

As part of the agreement, World Sailing has confirmed the appointment of Richard Slater (AUS) as the Chief Umpire of the 36th America’s Cup. Slater continues this role from the 35th America’s Cup and will lead a team of World Sailing International Umpires, afloat and ashore, throughout the next two years as the Cup implements electronic officiating and the well-established High Speed rules edition of the Racing Rules of Sailing.

AC36 Newsletter, comparando los cuatro AC75 botados.


copyright Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team / Carlo Borlenghi

copyright INEOS TEAM UK / Harry KH

copyright Emirates Team New Zealand

copyrightNYYC America Magic / Amory Ross

Fuente info AC36

26th October 2019

NO WRONG ANSWERS?

With four AC75s now successfully launched and actively foiling, what have we learned about the outcomes of the various design strategies chosen by each of the teams for their first-generation boats?

One thing seems clear – that there is more than one way of creating a 75-foot monohull that flies above the water on foils – a fact evidenced by the four distinctly different looking yachts that the teams have independently come up with.

There are so many ways to compare and contrast just how different all four boats look. For instance, the cigar-shaped bow of American Magic’s Defiance and the striking cutaway foredeck and slab sides of Ineos Team UK’s Britannia.

Then there is the comparatively flat bottoms of the American’s and British boats compared to the rounded and v-shaped longitudinal ‘bustles’ underneath the Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli boats respectively.

The closer you look the more the differences you find, and it is tempting to oversimplify things by falling back on the comfortable, well-worn adage that: “Somebody is going to be right, and somebody is going to be wrong”.

But is that really the case? What if in fact – at this stage – nobody is 100 per cent right, or 100 per cent wrong?

Given that all four teams have been up and foiling on these revolutionary boats within days on launching them, isn’t it possible that all four have come up with competitive designs – the performance of which may vary only marginally based on weather conditions and the speed with which the crews get to grips with sailing them?

Although the teams and their spies will have a gut feeling for who amongst them is fast or slow and in what conditions, they will be keeping that information close to their chest right now.

That means that the rest of us will have to wait six months until the teams all come together for the first time for four days of racing at the opening act of the America’s Cup World Series in Cagliari, Sardinia next April 23 – 26 to learn who – if anyone – has stolen a march on the rest.

For now though we can happily continue to pore over every photograph the teams release and squint as we step frame-by-frame through their videos for evidence to support our speculative theories about what the crews are trying out as they battle to get master their AC75s.

However, the reality is that there are so many differences between the four boats that we cannot hope to see even if we were charging alongside in a chase boat.

Those are the hidden differences in the systems that control the flaps on the foils, that determine the constantly shifting 3-D aerodynamic shape of the ground-breaking double-skinned mainsails, and a myriad of other complex elements that make up these highly technological AC75s.

How to effectively balance the complexity and functionality of these systems with the overall reliability of the boat will no doubt be high on the list of problems keeping the design teams and the sailors awake at night.

We may not get to know much about those critical concepts before this 36th edition of the America’s Cup is all played out, but they could easily prove to be the difference between success and failure when the competitive phase begins.

One question that is yet to be definitively answered concerns the crew logistics when manoeuvring the AC75s. Given the centrally divided cockpits on all four boats and the trend towards deck-sweeper mainsails, who amongst the crew will be changing sides and how will they be doing it.

With 11 on the crew, clearly not everyone is going to be running from one side to the other on the tacks and the gybes. Some teams are rumoured to be moving just a handful of sailors each time, while others – it is believed – are experimenting with two helmsman, one on either side of the boat.

It’s a radical approach for sure, but given that the team that can keep its boat in the air the most in a race will likely emerge the winner, it is a technique that is likely well worth trying.

AC36, dos nuevos barcos y sus diferencias de diseño.

Fuente info AC36

TWO MORE BOATS: NEW DESIGN DIFFERENCES
PUBLISHED ON
12 October 2019

After 18 months of heavy secrecy shrouding anything to do with the AC75s, the 75 foot foiling monohull is quickly becoming an open affair with two new boats unveiled last week less than 48 hours apart. This brings the total to four and provides us with plenty of opportunity to analyse the differences that are already apparent.

On the 3rd of October, the Italians of Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team were the third team to launch their boat after the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand and the USA Challenger NYYC American Magic. The Italian boat was christened ‘Luna Rossa’ by Miuccia Prada, CEO of the Prada Group together with her husband Patrizio Bertelli, during a ceremony at the team’s home base in Cagliari, Sardinia – the venue for the first America’s Cup World Series event next April.

A couple of days later in Portsmouth (UK), Julia Ratcliffe, the daughter of the syndicate owner Jim Ratcliffe, did the honours to name INEOS TEAM UK’s AC75 ‘Britannia’ in homage to one of Britain’s most famous racing yachts.

As the Protocol of the 36th America’s Cup doesn’t allow the teams to shroud their boats, the new 75′ monohulls were quickly snapped and “grammed” around the world for everyone – teams and fans – to comment and draw their first conclusions.

The new launches have only added to the diversity of Emirates Team New Zealand and NYYC American Magic’s interpretation of the AC75 Class Rule, confirming once again the high level of freedom allowed by the current design rules.

Design teams have spent a lot of time exploring different hull shapes within the Class Rule limits, looking for a shape with minimal drag as well as the stability required for take-off.

With the hull having no significant limits on ­structure other than a handful of standard AC rule limits, the shape of the hull is where the differences are most evident.

In broad terms it’s possible to pair the four boats with the Kiwis and the Italian choosing one approach and INEOS TEAM UK and American Magic going in another direction. However, experts may consider pairing the boats too simplistic. So what has been revealed so far that’s out there for everyone to see?

INEOS TEAM UK’s hull shape is probably the most radical in appearance; while the bottom has a very clean scow like line – similar to NYYC American Magic and opposite to Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa – the deck layout has a completely new design, with a very flat and low bow, slab sides and a straight sheerline toward the stern.

The British hull seems wider, with the foil rotation points (whose distance is fixed as per the Class Rule) appearing to be inside the hull compared to the other teams that have a dimple treatment where the carbon foil arms stick out from the hull.

Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli’s design has gone in the opposite direction with a boat similar but more radical than the Defender’s. Despite a more traditional bow – that gives a nod to those of the old America’s Cup boats – the sheerline is quite pronounced and tapers towards the transom. The bottom has a rounded-V structure in the centre ending just ahead of the rudder.

What the four AC75’s have in common is the cockpit where they are all divided in two by a central extension to the forward deck, creating two pits for the crew, all with variations to the layout, which will lead to interesting comparisons of crew dynamics while sailing for each of the teams.

In foil world, it was interesting to notice that both Luna Rossa and Britannia have also opted for a tapered central bulb similar to Defiant, leaving the Defender the only team going “against the tide” in that aspect of foil design. But there the similarities end. INEOS TEAM UK appear to have bigger wings and two different foil shapes per side, whereas Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli have the smallest wings seen so far and, although it is not possible to know what is happening at a systems level, their shapes look very much alike.

Last but not least the approach to regulate the new double mainsail concept showed some significant differences with Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli appearing to have the most intriguing system so far.

As declared at the Luna Rossa launch “the boom is there but you can’t see it”, which made everyone think the Italians won’t have a standard boom. Britannia has been launched without her mast, so it is not possible yet to determine what solution they have opted for.

There is still much more to be revealed, for example nothing has been – nor will be – revealed about the highly sophisticated flight-control systems that will be key in the performance of these boats.

Syndicates are allowed to build two boats and this first generation will be a major testing platform for the second generation which will be raced in Auckland. The question is, will we see such a diverse spread of designs across the second iterations of each teams AC75’s?

The premiere America’s Cup World Series event in Cagliari will provide the first real opportunity by which teams can measure themselves and their first boats against each other to see who has chosen the best path so far. In the meantime, Syndicates can only rely on their recon reports to gather information, analyse data and feed the findings into the design of their second boat as the construction of the second generation of AC75s is just few months away.

AC36. Ineos Team UK bota su primer AC75, bautizado Britannia.


copyright Harry KH

copyright Chris Ison

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

copyright Chris Ison

copyright Chris Ison

Fuente info Ineos Team UK

3 Oct 2019
RB1 Naming Day

INEOS TEAM UK name their first race boat for the 36th America’s Cup ‘Britannia’

Meet ‘Britannia’ Inspired by history with the aim to make history

Over 90,000 design & 50,000 construction hours completed Britannia christened by Julia Ratcliffe becoming the official Godmother
The British challenger set for a period of testing on Solent waters INEOS TEAM UK will represent Royal Yacht Squadron Racing as their challenging Yacht Club in the 36th America’s Cup in New Zealand in 2021

INEOS TEAM UK have officially christened their first America’s Cup race boat from their HQ in Portsmouth, naming her ‘Britannia’ in homage to one of Britain’s most famous racing yachts.

The day marks a landmark moment for the British challenger; coming after eighteen months of the design, build and development of one of the most complex America’s Cup class boats in the 168-year history of the event.

Team Principal and Skipper, Ben Ainslie welcomed owner Jim Ratcliffe and the wider INEOS family, teammates, partners and suppliers to celebrate the naming day; “The quest to win the 36th America’s Cup has required a fresh approach, a new strategy and serious support from INEOS to focus entirely on the mission in hand. I’m hugely proud of the team’s commitment to design and build our first race-boat, it’s taken a serious amount of hard work and now we can’t wait to get Britannia out sailing on the Solent.”

From the moment the AC75 Class Rule was published on 29 March 2018 by the Defender, Emirates Team New Zealand, the team have put over 90,000 design and 50,000 construction hours to get Britannia in the water.

INEOS TEAM UK Chief Designer, Nick Holroyd, outlined the complexity of the challenge; “This AC75 is the first foiling monohull of this size, it’s unlike anything ever seen on the water before, it’s hugely ambitious and it sets out an entirely new type of boat and with only eighteen months to design and build there comes challenges, but that’s what makes the Cup so exciting.”

The name ‘Britannia’ was chosen by INEOS TEAM UK founder and owner Sir Jim Ratcliffe in homage to the racing cutter yacht ‘Britannia’ whose name in turn was taken from James Thomson’s famous poem ‘Rule Britannia!’ written in 1740. The original Britannia was built in 1893 for King Edward VII, the then Prince of Wales.

King George V took ownership of Britannia in her final years converting her into a J Class racing yacht, the majestic class that was sailed in three editions of the America’s Cup from 1930-1937. She eventually finished with a lifetime record of 231 race wins and 129 further podiums making her the dominant yacht of the time.

King George V had decreed that his yacht should not outlive him. After his death in 1936, Britannia was stripped of her spars and fittings, and towed out to St Catherine’s Deep off the Isle of Wight where she was scuttled by the Royal Navy; in the same waters that the first America’s Cup was raced in back in 1851. Notably, the mast and fittings of the yacht were saved from the scuttling with the wheel subsequently fitted to the wheelhouse of the Royal Yacht Britannia steering her for the next 44 years.

INEOS TEAM UK now have a busy period of testing on Solent waters from their HQ in Portsmouth, before heading to Sardinia for winter testing ahead of the first America’s Cup World Series event in Cagliari from 23rd – 26th April 2020.

AC75 Britannia in numbers

Construction hours: 50,000 +
Design hours: 90,000 +
CNC Machine hours: 45,000+
Individual parts: 25,000
Estimated top speed: 50knots / 57.5 mph / 92.6km/h
Length: 22.76m with bowsprit (20.7m without)
Max Beam: 5m beam
Weight: 6,450 tonnes
Hull and rig construction: Carbon fibre
Rig: Double-skinned soft-wingsail
Crew: 11
Crew weight: Max 990kg