AC36, dos nuevos barcos y sus diferencias de diseño.

Fuente info AC36

TWO MORE BOATS: NEW DESIGN DIFFERENCES
PUBLISHED ON
12 October 2019

After 18 months of heavy secrecy shrouding anything to do with the AC75s, the 75 foot foiling monohull is quickly becoming an open affair with two new boats unveiled last week less than 48 hours apart. This brings the total to four and provides us with plenty of opportunity to analyse the differences that are already apparent.

On the 3rd of October, the Italians of Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team were the third team to launch their boat after the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand and the USA Challenger NYYC American Magic. The Italian boat was christened ‘Luna Rossa’ by Miuccia Prada, CEO of the Prada Group together with her husband Patrizio Bertelli, during a ceremony at the team’s home base in Cagliari, Sardinia – the venue for the first America’s Cup World Series event next April.

A couple of days later in Portsmouth (UK), Julia Ratcliffe, the daughter of the syndicate owner Jim Ratcliffe, did the honours to name INEOS TEAM UK’s AC75 ‘Britannia’ in homage to one of Britain’s most famous racing yachts.

As the Protocol of the 36th America’s Cup doesn’t allow the teams to shroud their boats, the new 75′ monohulls were quickly snapped and “grammed” around the world for everyone – teams and fans – to comment and draw their first conclusions.

The new launches have only added to the diversity of Emirates Team New Zealand and NYYC American Magic’s interpretation of the AC75 Class Rule, confirming once again the high level of freedom allowed by the current design rules.

Design teams have spent a lot of time exploring different hull shapes within the Class Rule limits, looking for a shape with minimal drag as well as the stability required for take-off.

With the hull having no significant limits on ­structure other than a handful of standard AC rule limits, the shape of the hull is where the differences are most evident.

In broad terms it’s possible to pair the four boats with the Kiwis and the Italian choosing one approach and INEOS TEAM UK and American Magic going in another direction. However, experts may consider pairing the boats too simplistic. So what has been revealed so far that’s out there for everyone to see?

INEOS TEAM UK’s hull shape is probably the most radical in appearance; while the bottom has a very clean scow like line – similar to NYYC American Magic and opposite to Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa – the deck layout has a completely new design, with a very flat and low bow, slab sides and a straight sheerline toward the stern.

The British hull seems wider, with the foil rotation points (whose distance is fixed as per the Class Rule) appearing to be inside the hull compared to the other teams that have a dimple treatment where the carbon foil arms stick out from the hull.

Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli’s design has gone in the opposite direction with a boat similar but more radical than the Defender’s. Despite a more traditional bow – that gives a nod to those of the old America’s Cup boats – the sheerline is quite pronounced and tapers towards the transom. The bottom has a rounded-V structure in the centre ending just ahead of the rudder.

What the four AC75’s have in common is the cockpit where they are all divided in two by a central extension to the forward deck, creating two pits for the crew, all with variations to the layout, which will lead to interesting comparisons of crew dynamics while sailing for each of the teams.

In foil world, it was interesting to notice that both Luna Rossa and Britannia have also opted for a tapered central bulb similar to Defiant, leaving the Defender the only team going “against the tide” in that aspect of foil design. But there the similarities end. INEOS TEAM UK appear to have bigger wings and two different foil shapes per side, whereas Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli have the smallest wings seen so far and, although it is not possible to know what is happening at a systems level, their shapes look very much alike.

Last but not least the approach to regulate the new double mainsail concept showed some significant differences with Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli appearing to have the most intriguing system so far.

As declared at the Luna Rossa launch “the boom is there but you can’t see it”, which made everyone think the Italians won’t have a standard boom. Britannia has been launched without her mast, so it is not possible yet to determine what solution they have opted for.

There is still much more to be revealed, for example nothing has been – nor will be – revealed about the highly sophisticated flight-control systems that will be key in the performance of these boats.

Syndicates are allowed to build two boats and this first generation will be a major testing platform for the second generation which will be raced in Auckland. The question is, will we see such a diverse spread of designs across the second iterations of each teams AC75’s?

The premiere America’s Cup World Series event in Cagliari will provide the first real opportunity by which teams can measure themselves and their first boats against each other to see who has chosen the best path so far. In the meantime, Syndicates can only rely on their recon reports to gather information, analyse data and feed the findings into the design of their second boat as the construction of the second generation of AC75s is just few months away.

AC36. Ineos Team UK bota su primer AC75, bautizado Britannia.


copyright Harry KH

copyright Chris Ison

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

Copyright Shaun Roster Photography.

copyright Chris Ison

copyright Chris Ison

Fuente info Ineos Team UK

3 Oct 2019
RB1 Naming Day

INEOS TEAM UK name their first race boat for the 36th America’s Cup ‘Britannia’

Meet ‘Britannia’ Inspired by history with the aim to make history

Over 90,000 design & 50,000 construction hours completed Britannia christened by Julia Ratcliffe becoming the official Godmother
The British challenger set for a period of testing on Solent waters INEOS TEAM UK will represent Royal Yacht Squadron Racing as their challenging Yacht Club in the 36th America’s Cup in New Zealand in 2021

INEOS TEAM UK have officially christened their first America’s Cup race boat from their HQ in Portsmouth, naming her ‘Britannia’ in homage to one of Britain’s most famous racing yachts.

The day marks a landmark moment for the British challenger; coming after eighteen months of the design, build and development of one of the most complex America’s Cup class boats in the 168-year history of the event.

Team Principal and Skipper, Ben Ainslie welcomed owner Jim Ratcliffe and the wider INEOS family, teammates, partners and suppliers to celebrate the naming day; “The quest to win the 36th America’s Cup has required a fresh approach, a new strategy and serious support from INEOS to focus entirely on the mission in hand. I’m hugely proud of the team’s commitment to design and build our first race-boat, it’s taken a serious amount of hard work and now we can’t wait to get Britannia out sailing on the Solent.”

From the moment the AC75 Class Rule was published on 29 March 2018 by the Defender, Emirates Team New Zealand, the team have put over 90,000 design and 50,000 construction hours to get Britannia in the water.

INEOS TEAM UK Chief Designer, Nick Holroyd, outlined the complexity of the challenge; “This AC75 is the first foiling monohull of this size, it’s unlike anything ever seen on the water before, it’s hugely ambitious and it sets out an entirely new type of boat and with only eighteen months to design and build there comes challenges, but that’s what makes the Cup so exciting.”

The name ‘Britannia’ was chosen by INEOS TEAM UK founder and owner Sir Jim Ratcliffe in homage to the racing cutter yacht ‘Britannia’ whose name in turn was taken from James Thomson’s famous poem ‘Rule Britannia!’ written in 1740. The original Britannia was built in 1893 for King Edward VII, the then Prince of Wales.

King George V took ownership of Britannia in her final years converting her into a J Class racing yacht, the majestic class that was sailed in three editions of the America’s Cup from 1930-1937. She eventually finished with a lifetime record of 231 race wins and 129 further podiums making her the dominant yacht of the time.

King George V had decreed that his yacht should not outlive him. After his death in 1936, Britannia was stripped of her spars and fittings, and towed out to St Catherine’s Deep off the Isle of Wight where she was scuttled by the Royal Navy; in the same waters that the first America’s Cup was raced in back in 1851. Notably, the mast and fittings of the yacht were saved from the scuttling with the wheel subsequently fitted to the wheelhouse of the Royal Yacht Britannia steering her for the next 44 years.

INEOS TEAM UK now have a busy period of testing on Solent waters from their HQ in Portsmouth, before heading to Sardinia for winter testing ahead of the first America’s Cup World Series event in Cagliari from 23rd – 26th April 2020.

AC75 Britannia in numbers

Construction hours: 50,000 +
Design hours: 90,000 +
CNC Machine hours: 45,000+
Individual parts: 25,000
Estimated top speed: 50knots / 57.5 mph / 92.6km/h
Length: 22.76m with bowsprit (20.7m without)
Max Beam: 5m beam
Weight: 6,450 tonnes
Hull and rig construction: Carbon fibre
Rig: Double-skinned soft-wingsail
Crew: 11
Crew weight: Max 990kg

AC36, comparando los dos primeros AC75.


Photo credit: Emirates Team New Zealand                                                       Photo credit: Amory Ross

Fuente info AC36

ONE CLASS, TWO DIFFERENT DESIGNS: WHAT NEXT?
Published on
27 September 2019

The much-anticipated launch of the first two AC75 foiling monohull yachts from the Defender Emirates Team New Zealand and USA Challenger NYYC American Magic respectively did not disappoint the masses of America’s Cup fans waiting eagerly for their first glimpse of an AC75 ‘in the flesh’.

Emirates Team New Zealand were the first to officially reveal their boat at an early morning naming ceremony on September 6. Resplendent in the team’s familiar red, black and grey livery, the Kiwi AC75 was given the Maori name ‘Te Aihe’ (Dolphin).

Meanwhile, the Americans somewhat broke with protocol by carrying out a series of un-announced test sails and were the first team to foil their AC75 on the water prior to a formal launch ceremony on Friday September 14 when their dark blue boat was given the name ‘Defiant’.

But it was not just the paint jobs that differentiated the first two boats of this 36th America’s Cup cycle – as it quickly became apparent that the New Zealand and American hull designs were also strikingly different.On first comparison the two teams’ differing interpretations of the AC75 design rule are especially obvious in the shape of the hull and the appendages.

While the New Zealanders have opted for a bow section that is – for want of a better word – ‘pointy’, the Americans have gone a totally different route with a bulbous bow that some have described as ‘scow-like’ – although true scow bows are prohibited in the AC75 design rule.

The differences between the two AC75 hulls do not stop there, with the two design teams taking significantly contrasting approaches on the underwater profiles of their AC75s as well.

While the American Magic AC75 appears to have been built with an all but totally flat underwater section, Emirates Team New Zealand’s boat has a pronounced longitudinal bulge underneath running almost from bow to stern.

These two different approaches have set the sailing world alight with fans speculating over the thinking is behind each of them and pondering what the sailing characteristics of each boat might be.

Despite being very different the images of the two boats reveal some similarities as well such as the cockpit layout. Both teams have their cockpit divided in two by a central extension to the forward deck, creating two pits in which the crew can operate low down and out of the airstream. There will be plenty of improvements to come on how teams will manoeuvre the boats but so far both teams seem to have decided on fixed positions for their grinders who won’t cross sides during tacks and jibes.

With foiling now established for the America’s Cup, a key focus for designers has been to make the foils more efficient. Once again designing the shape, width and thickness of the foil wing is a trade-off between speed and stability.

The path chosen by the two teams have been very diverse. Emirates Team New Zealand has two different foils: one with anhedral angle and the other one which is straight. American Magic, on the contrary, seems to have two very similar foils wings in terms of shape and that’s probably because the Kiwis are still testing solutions whereas the Americans having been sailing consistently with their test boat, might have already got to some key conclusions.

Given that we can expect the teams to build and test a multitude of shapes in the run up to the 36th America’s Cup there is probably little to be gained from too much analysis there at this stage.

After almost a decade, soft sails are back in the America’s Cup and a lot of effort has been put in by the teams adapting the twin skinned mainsail concept to the new Class Rule with the main difference between the two AC75 appearing to be the boom position in relation to the mainsail foot. The Americans sporting a conventional boom, whereas the Kiwis have opted for a deck-sweeper mainsail foot, not unlike those used on the latest A-Class catamarans.

Despite all their differences – in their bows, underwater sections, and other design features – it is worth noting that both boats were foiling (and seemingly stably) within hours of going sailing for the first time. That is a remarkable achievement for both syndicates and a testimony to both the designers and builders, as well as to the efficacy of the AC75 design rule itself.
Then There Were Two

And it seems we will not have to wait very long for the next two AC75s to see the first light of day. The Italian Official Challenger of Record Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli Team is scheduled to be the next to launch on October 2, with the British INEOS Team UK syndicate following suit two days later.

Could we see two more surprising design ideas on show then?